Does liquidated honey means the honey is clear or watery

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nylg85

Senior Member
Chinese
Hi, everyone.

Today I had a little chat with a guy from Austrial. My colleague showed him a jar of Austrial natural honey she bought during a food fair for very cheap a while ago. That guy held the jar of honey and looking at it with sceptical facial expression and say something like why the honey looks very liquidate. I cut in between them and asked that guy should the real honey looks thicker? That guy seems confused with my question. I thought liquidate should be meaning the fluid is watery but not nesessary has to be in condensed form or should I say thick? After I looked up the word I found the first writen meaning is fluid in clear form. Now I think that I must had misunderstand what that guy was saying. He might be saying that why the honey looks clear.

I have no idea. Because it could be meant both. Which one would you think was the one that guy was saying?

Thank you for clearing my doubts
 
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  • nylg85

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    liquidate - WordReference.com Dictionary of English
    "Liquidate" is a verb that has to do with selling things - turning "solid" assets into "liquid" cash. It's not used for any meaning related to actual fluids.
    Thank you for replying.
    Now I realized that the word's defination doesn't has anything to do with fluid at all. May I ask you what is the word for the fluid that is not watery? Thick? condensed? or even better word.

    Thank again.
     

    nylg85

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    Liquidate =
    • turn assets into cash
    • declare a company bankrupt
    • destroy, kill
    Liquefy =
    • turn a solid into liquid.
    Thank you for your reply.
    hmmm...I did hear he said liquidate. but now i realized there nothing to do with fluid at all. I wonder if i have misheard.

    Thanks again for your kindly advices.
     
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    manfy

    Senior Member
    German - Austria
    May I ask you what is the word for the fluid that is not watery? Thick? condensed? or even better word.

    Thank again.
    I'd use the adjective 'viscous' with honey. When it has low viscosity it is more liquid and flows easily, with high viscosity it is almost solid.

    Some people might use the terms 'thick/thin honey' in everyday language and that sounds less "technical".

    [correction of low/high viscosity definition]
     
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    manfy

    Senior Member
    German - Austria
    The other way round, I believe. Perhaps you mistyped.
    :thumbsup: Right! I always get that one wrong. :(

    PS: @nylg85
    Today I had a little chat with a guy from Austrial.
    It would be good to know whether *Austrial is a typo for Austria (a little patch of grass and rocks in the middle of Europe) or Australia (a not quite so little patch of land somewhere in the waters down south). :cool:
     
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    nylg85

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    I'd use the adjective 'viscous' with honey. When it has low viscosity it is more liquid and flows easily, with high viscosity it is almost solid.

    Some people might use the terms 'thick/thin honey' in everyday language and that sounds less "technical".

    [correction of low/high viscosity definition]
    Thank you for your reply. I'm glad that you came up with this word viscous. I didn't really know about it until now. Thank you so much.

    I think he might have said liquidy.

    Is Liquidy A Word?

    Some one in this forum said that watery is for professional or formal use while liquidy is ok for casual setting. But watery sounds very casual to me.
     

    velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
    I could talk about thick honey, or honey that is runny, thin, or too liquid.

    The only problem with the word "runny" is that it rhymes with "honey", and "runny honey" sounds a little silly to me.
     

    Keith Bradford

    Senior Member
    English (Midlands UK)
    Liquidy is not a word. The following are, however:

    Diluted, flowing, fluid, liquefied, liquid, melted, streaming, watery.

    The ones in bold are applicable to honey.

    Their opposites are gelatinous, gluey, glutinous, gooey (informal), mucilaginous, sticky, syrupy, thick, treacly, viscid.

    Source: The New Collins Thesaurus, London, 1984.
     

    Linkway

    Senior Member
    British English
    I am puzzled by this!
    I've never heard of honey becoming watery or runny or anything like that.
    If a jar of honey is left unused for a long time, it may "set" or become more solid.
     

    Andygc

    Senior Member
    British English
    The only problem with the word "runny" is that it rhymes with "honey", and "runny honey" sounds a little silly to me.
    What else would you call it? We've been eating runny honey for years. You can't pour set honey.

    Honey doesn't become runny, though. That's the way bees make it.
     

    velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
    Spme honeys are runnier than others, and I suppose a honey that is not pure may be any kind of consistency.

    I don't usually talk about "runny honey", any more than I talk about "liquid milk".
     

    ain'ttranslationfun?

    Senior Member
    US English
    The only problem with the word "runny" is that it rhymes with "honey", and "runny honey" sounds a little silly to me.
    Or "runny hunny sounds funny" (as Pooh Bear might have said) :). But 'viscous' doesn't sound very appetizing to me. I'd prefer Keith B"s 'liquid honey', and for the other kind 'thick honey'.
     

    velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
    Honey becomes liquid when it's heated. I wouldn't call its normal state "liquid".

    Edit: To answer the original question, I imagine that the person who said "liquidated" meant "too runny/too liquid". It would hardly be referring to how clear the honey was. We still don't know what nationality the speaker was. Australian?
     

    You little ripper!

    Senior Member
    Australian English
    We still don't know what nationality the speaker was. Australian?
    Not this one. :D This one would use the word 'liquefied' to describe honey in a runny state. According to this website:

    What Do You Do With Crystallized Honey?

    Three things make honey more likely to crystallize: 1. Temperature 2. The ratio of glucose and fructose in the honey 3. Pollen
    Honey will crystallize in the hive if the temperature goes below 50ºF (10ºC), and honey will crystallize in your containers if you have a cold cupboard cabinet. Finding a warmer spot to store your honey will slow crystallization. It's fairly simple to turn your honey back into a smooth liquid again by heating it. ...............
     

    Andygc

    Senior Member
    British English
    I wouldn't call its normal state "liquid".
    On the contrary, the normal state of honey, before people do things to it, is liquid. Bees make it as a liquid and store it as a liquid. Bee keepers collect it by centrifugal extraction, then pour it through a filter to remove solids, and then pour it into jars or bulk containers. It only becomes thicker when the sugars begin to crystallise.

    And "runny honey" is a standard description. (At least in BE)
    https://www.waitrose.com/ecom/shop/...oney_and_spreads/honey_and_syrups/runny_honey
    Sainsbury's - Please enable cookies or JavaScript
    Online Food Shopping - ASDA Groceries
    Runny Honey: Honey: Jam, Honey & Spreads: Food Cupboard: Ocado: Shop
    Morrisons: Shop: Food Cupboard: Jams, Honey & Spreads: Honey: Runny Honey

    (Ignore Sainsbury's message about cookies, if there is one in your browser, the link works)

    But never "liquidated honey".
     

    velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
    Granted, "runny honey" is an expression in English because English speakers are used to a choice between natural honey and "set honey", which is spreadable.
     

    You little ripper!

    Senior Member
    Australian English
    "Runny honey" must be a British thing. I don't think I've heard anyone here call it that. Maybe a child. We might say, "This honey is very runny" but most of us refer to it as "liquid honey".
     

    nylg85

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    I am puzzled by this!
    I've never heard of honey becoming watery or runny or anything like that.
    If a jar of honey is left unused for a long time, it may "set" or become more solid.
    Thank you for answering. And thanks for brought up the word runny. The jar of honey wasn't runny water but more like syrup.
     

    nylg85

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    I could talk about thick honey, or honey that is runny, thin, or too liquid.

    The only problem with the word "runny" is that it rhymes with "honey", and "runny honey" sounds a little silly to me.
    Thank you for answering. I think the word runny is very useful.
     

    nylg85

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    What else would you call it? We've been eating runny honey for years. You can't pour set honey.

    Honey doesn't become runny, though. That's the way bees make it.
    Thank you for answering. Your answer is very fun to read. lol
     

    nylg85

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    Honey becomes liquid when it's heated. I wouldn't call its normal state "liquid".

    Edit: To answer the original question, I imagine that the person who said "liquidated" meant "too runny/too liquid". It would hardly be referring to how clear the honey was. We still don't know what nationality the speaker was. Australian?
    Thank you for answering.
    Yes, he was from Australian. I think I might have heard liquidy instead of liquidate.
     
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