Does "meet" have progressive aspect

user1006

Member
English US
I'd like to if verb "meet" can have progressive aspect such as "I am meeting him" or "I have been meeting him".
 
  • Cenzontle

    Senior Member
    English, U.S.
    "I have been meeting him" indicates a series of several meetings.
    "I am meeting him" could mean the same thing, or it could refer to the future: "I'm meeting him at the station this afternoon."
     

    user1006

    Member
    English US
    "I have been meeting him" indicates a series of several meetings.
    "I am meeting him" could mean the same thing, or it could refer to the future: "I'm meeting him at the station this afternoon."
    Does "I have been meeting him" not indicate that I have been with him for sometime (without interruption)?
     

    Cenzontle

    Senior Member
    English, U.S.
    In my English, "I have been meeting him" cannot refer to a single session.
    On the other hand, I can say "I have been meeting with him for two hours" and it can refer to a single session.
     

    bennymix

    Senior Member
    I agree with Cenzontle. "have been" without qualifiers suggests several past meetings.

    USERL I'd like to if verb "meet" can have progressive aspect such as "I am meeting him" or "I have been meeting him".

    User: meet has two senses, one 1) means encounter (come face-to-face with), an event, the other 2) means 'be in a meeting'

    For the first sense, the progressive couldn't be one encounter, but it could be a series of them. The second sense can easily be progressive, same as "I am chatting": "I am meeting my new students this hour."
     

    Cenzontle

    Senior Member
    English, U.S.
    "I am meeting my new students this hour."
    Is that a series of meetings, one student after another?
    With just one student, I think you could say, for example on the telephone,
    "I'm meeting one of my students this hour" ONLY if the student has not yet arrived ("I am meeting [in the future]...").
    After the student arrives and you introduce yourselves, you have met each other,
    and you can no longer use "meet" (transitive) in a present tense, whether simple or progressive.
    You can, however, use "meet [intransitive] with" if the phone call interrupts your conversation:
    "Sorry, I can't talk now, I'm meeting with one of my students until 2 o'clock."
     

    user1006

    Member
    English US
    I agree with Cenzontle. "have been" without qualifiers suggests several past meetings.

    USERL I'd like to if verb "meet" can have progressive aspect such as "I am meeting him" or "I have been meeting him".

    User: meet has two senses, one 1) means encounter (come face-to-face with), an event, the other 2) means 'be in a meeting'

    For the first sense, the progressive couldn't be one encounter, but it could be a series of them. The second sense can easily be progressive, same as "I am chatting": "I am meeting my new students this hour."
    Must several past meetings be continuous without interruption since present perfect progressive indicates a continuous action?
     

    bennymix

    Senior Member
    Must several past meetings be continuous without interruption since present perfect progressive indicates a continuous action?

    No, there needn't be continuous action. A regular pattern of repetition will do. (Last Mon noon; last Tues noon; last Wed, 1 pm, etc.)
    Is that a series of meetings, one student after another?
    With just one student, I think you could say, for example on the telephone,
    "I'm meeting one of my students this hour" ONLY if the student has not yet arrived ("I am meeting [in the future]...").
    After the student arrives and you introduce yourselves, you have met each other,
    and you can no longer use "meet" (transitive) in a present tense, whether simple or progressive.
    You can, however, use "meet [intransitive] with" if the phone call interrupts your conversation:
    "Sorry, I can't talk now, I'm meeting with one of my students until 2 o'clock."
    I meant the new students more or less as a group. Same meaning as "I'm in a meeting with new students this hour."

    This sense of meeting allows a past progressive, "I was meeting (with)my new students on my lunch hour yesterday, when my wife phoned to say the dog was sick."
     
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