does not really say any thing about

Roundhouse

Senior Member
Bengali
I wrote the following sentences:

(This is a statement) The Employment Insurance program presumes that the higher the regional unemployment rate, the harder it is [for unemployed workers] to find new employment.

(This is an argument) The regional unemployment rate alone does not really say any thing about how hard or easy it is for a particular worker to find new employment in a given region.

The green part is something we would use in an informal conversation. But in formal writing, a more sophisticated phrase or word needs to be used instead. I can't really figure out the best option that is fully equivalent to "really say any thing about."

Some options I came up with (but I doubt are equivalent) are the following:

1. reflect
2. indicate
3. suggest
4. imply
5. connote?

Which of these (or any other that I missed) fits best?
 
  • Uncle Jack

    Senior Member
    British English
    I'd prefer "reflect", because the thing you want to know about is how hard it is for a worker to find employment, and it is this that you want the unemployment rate to reveal. "Indicate" is fine but describes the relationship the other way round. "Suggest" and "imply" both describe a very much looser relationship, also placing the emphasis on the unemployment rate. "Connote" is used more for qualitative relationships, also in a rather loose way. It is also considerably rarer than the others..
     

    kentix

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    The regional unemployment rate alone does not really say any thing about how hard or easy it is for a particular worker to find new employment in a given region.

    Here's my thought:

    The regional unemployment rate alone is not an accurate* predictor of how difficult it is for a particular worker to find new employment in a given region.

    * useful, competent, effective

    "how hard or easy it is" does not sound like academic phrasing to me.
     
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