dog-slow

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searcher123

Senior Member
Farsi/Persian/فارسي
What does dog-slow means?

Example:
One final word on iOs 4: If you have an iPhone 3G, don’t try to install iOs 4 on it. Previously zippy tasks may become dogslow after upgrading. It’s not worth it.

Regards
 
  • herut

    Senior Member
    HKI
    Finnish
    "Slow as a dog", probably a variation of "sick as a dog"-- why a dog? I suppose there's no definite answer to that.
     

    JamesM

    Senior Member
    "Dog-slow" is not unusual in American English, in my experience, at least when dealing with computers. "My PC's a dog" means that it is slow and unresponsive. "Windows Vista is a dog" means that it is slow, unwieldy and unattractive. "Dog-slow" would mean, to me, "as slow as a dog (of a PC)".

    "Dog" meaning "unattractive" and "undesirable" is very common in American English.
     

    Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    I'm sorry Rover (and Spot and Fido), but "dog-slow" is actually used in some places. "Slow as a dog" and "runs like a dog" are much more common ways to say "slow". A great many animal metaphors are completely unrelated to the actual behavior of the animal in question.
    "Dog-slow" probably formed as an assumed parallel to "dog-tired".
     

    searcher123

    Senior Member
    Farsi/Persian/فارسي
    I doubt that dogslow was written by a native speaker.

    It is a non-standard word and a most inappropriate metaphor, as dogs are not typically slow-moving animals.

    I recommend that you forget it.

    Rover
    Thanks to answer.
    Well, this word was written in PCWorld Magazine/Oct. 2010/Page 44 printed in U.S.A.

    I was surprised exactly because, just as you, I believe dogs are very fast animals and this word sound contradictive for me too!
     

    e2efour

    Senior Member
    UK English
    It is a non-standard word and a most inappropriate metaphor, as dogs are not typically slow-moving animals.
    Rover
    I sympathise with your description of inappropriate here, but is that enough to restrict its use, which appears to be common in the US? There must be lots of expressions which cause irritation like this.

    On the other hand, could it be that dog-slow really commes from doggone slow, which (presumably) has nothing to do with dogs?
     
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