doing fine

stuupid

Banned
Sundanese
A: How is your children?
B: Fine thanks. Yes, they are doing fine.

I'm wondering what "do" means in "doing fine?"
 
  • Uncle Jack

    Senior Member
    British English
    It doesn't refer to any specific action, but to how they are getting on with life generally. "Do" is the usual verb with "fine", although it is often omitted, as it is in B's initial response. In any case, "be" and "do" are often interchangeable in conventional greetings, and a "be" question ("How are you?", for example) might be answered with a "do" answer ("I'm doing fine") or a "do" question ("How are you doing?") might be answered with a "be" answer ("I'm well, thank you").

    A's sentence is wrong. It should be "How are your children?" because "children" is plural.
     

    stuupid

    Banned
    Sundanese
    It doesn't refer to any specific action, but to how they are getting on with life generally. "Do" is the usual verb with "fine", although it is often omitted, as it is in B's initial response. In any case, "be" and "do" are often interchangeable in conventional greetings, and a "be" question ("How are you?", for example) might be answered with a "do" answer ("I'm doing fine") or a "do" question ("How are you doing?") might be answered with a "be" answer ("I'm well, thank you").

    A's sentence is wrong. It should be "How are your children?" because "children" is plural.
    Thank you, Uncle Jack. I'm wondering what "do" actually means there? Doesn't it have a sense?
     

    RM1(SS)

    Senior Member
    English - US (Midwest)
    WRF Random House Learner's:

    17. to get along;
    fare;
    manage: [no object]
    How are you doing at work?
     
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