Dollar sign ($)

vesperlynd

Member
French (Québec, Canada)
In English do we put the dollar sign ($) before or after the number:

Ex: 10 000 $ or $ 10 000 ???

And million never take an "s" even if we say ten million ?
 
  • cuchuflete

    Senior Member
    EEUU-inglés
    In English do we put the dollar sign ($) before or after the number:

    Ex: 10 000 $ or $ 10 000 ???

    And million never take an "s" even if we say ten million ?
    In English we do not leave a space between a word and the punctuation signs:

    "...say ten million?"

    We can say both ten million and ten millions. It depends on the context.

    The singular, million, is much more common.

    But we do say ten million of people, without the s ?
    No, we say ten million people. There is no "of".
     

    timpeac

    Senior Member
    English (England)
    In English do we put the dollar sign ($) before or after the number:

    Ex: 10 000 $ or $ 10 000 ???

    And million never take an "s" even if we say ten million ?
    Before, usually - but when we use acronyms it follows -

    10,000 USD 32,993,543 GBP

    Note that we use a comma not a space to separate the thousands.
     

    JamesM

    Senior Member
    Just as a side note, the initialism (USD) is more accurate since the $ symbol is not exclusive to dollars. The same sign is used for pesos in Mexico, for example. However, in the U.S. we don't usually see the initialism except in an international context (such as a translation of British pounds into a dollar equivalent in a news article.)
     

    GreenWhiteBlue

    Senior Member
    USA - English
    It is grammatical to say either "ten million dollars" or "ten millions of dollars". (Note that the plural only goes with the 'of'.) However, just because both are grammatical does not mean that both are common or standard. The form "ten millions of dollars" is very archaic, and most modern speakers would find it so strange that they would consider it wrong. The common, natural way to say it in modern English is "ten million dollars".
     

    teksch

    Senior Member
    English - American
    Just as a side note, the initialism (USD) is more accurate since the $ symbol is not exclusive to dollars. The same sign is used for pesos in Mexico, for example. However, in the U.S. we don't usually see the initialism except in an international context (such as a translation of British pounds into a dollar equivalent in a news article.)
    Actually, in Mexico there is one line through the "S" and in the U.S. there are two lines. This is the way the Mexicans tell if an item is priced in pecos or U.S. dollars.
     

    TriglavNationalPark

    Senior Member
    Slovenian (a.k.a. Slovene)
    Before, usually - but when we use acronyms it follows -

    10,000 USD 32,993,543 GBP
    Not necessarily. Many news organizations prefer to write use initialisms of currencies before the numbers (GBP 10 million rather than 10 million GBP, for example). However, because not all people are familiar with these initialisms, news organizations often write out the full name of the currency (euros instead of EUR, for instance), in which case the number does go first: 50 million euros.
     

    timpeac

    Senior Member
    English (England)
    Not necessarily. Many news organizations prefer to write use initialisms of currencies before the numbers (GBP 10 million rather than 10 million GBP, for example). However, because not all people are familiar with these initialisms, news organizations often write out the full name of the currency (euros instead of EUR, for instance), in which case the number does go first: 50 million euros.
    Yes true - I hadn't thought of that.

    A note for those wondering about pronunciation of that if it precedes then we would read out each letter "you ess dee 10 million" but if it follows you could either say the letters or the words. In speech you would only do either if you need to be clear about the currency but I think it would be more usual to follow with the words - "I took 100 Australian dollars I had left from my holiday to the bank".
     

    JamesM

    Senior Member
    While the above is true, if the quantity was being emphasized "tens of millions of dollars" would be a natural way of phrasing it too.
    "Tens of millions of dollars" means that the amount was twenty million dollars or more. "Tens of" means that there are at least two groups of ten million dollars being discussed, in the same way that "dozens of eggs were broken" means that there were at least two dozen eggs broken. It does not mean the same thing as "ten million dollars."
     
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    nmkit

    Member
    English-US
    "Tens of millions of dollars" means that the amount was twenty million dollars or more. "Tens of" means that there are at least two groups of ten million dollars being discussed, in the same way that "dozens of eggs were broken" means that there were at least two dozen eggs broken. It does not mean the same thing as "ten million dollars."
    Absolutely James, I should have gone and pointed that out, my point being that it is another way of hearing the phrase, but yes it doesn't mean the 10 million. Thanks for pointing that out.
     

    natkretep

    Moderato con anima (English Only)
    English (Singapore/UK), basic Chinese
    No, while it can have two lines, the U.S. dollar sign usually has just one line through it, as the character "$" illustrates.
    Yes, I usually see it with one line through it these days. Two lines just looks old fashioned. Same for the £ symbol (usually one line across - the double line version ₤ looks old-fashioned).

    Apart from the three-letter codes to distinguish between the different dollars (USD, CAD, AUD, NZD, SGD, BND), letter-and-dollar-sign combinations are available (US$, C$, A$, NZ$, S$, B$ - although I think Au$, $Au, Aud$, $Aud, Aus$, and $Aus are also available for A$).
     

    timpeac

    Senior Member
    English (England)
    although I think Au$, $Au, Aud$, $Aud, Aus$, and $Aus are also available for A$).
    Maybe - but in what context? I don't say that you are wrong, that these forms don't exist - but I can say that I've never seen them. For example, the way you use "A$" is clear given the preceding sentence but if I read it somewhere it wouldn't occur to me that Australian dollars were meant, it would just look confusing.
     

    natkretep

    Moderato con anima (English Only)
    English (Singapore/UK), basic Chinese
    Partly to do with proximity - we see more A$ in this part of the world, particularly there's also the Hong Kong Dollar (HK$), New Zealand Dollar (NZ$) and Singapore Dollar (S$) to contend with.

    The alternative forms for the Australian dollar are forms that I recall from pamphlets or books. EBay uses AU $. The Forex Trading site notes:

    It is abbreviated by a ‘$’ sign, with substitutes such as $A, $AU, or AU$ and is used to differentiate between the other dollar currencies.
     
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