Domicile

A-friend

Senior Member
Persian (Farsi)
I want to ask someone formally in a pollite way that where does they live! What shall I say?
Is it possible to say: "Where do you inhabit?"
I know that such a verb is not used in everyday English and instead the verb "live" is used! But I need to know is it possible or not? Or how shall I ask sb in a very formal and polite wayabout their domicile place?
 
  • tepatria

    Senior Member
    Canadian English
    Hello and welcome to the forum. "Where do you live?" is a perfectly polite way ti ask this question. I don't think any English speaker would ever say "Where do you inhabit?"
    We do not use abbreviations like sb on this forum. If you read the rules for posting you will see the acceptable abbreviations.
     

    A-friend

    Senior Member
    Persian (Farsi)
    thanks tepatria. It sounds very informative to be here and having relation with people like you. Thanks againg for informing me about the usage of abbreviations ;)
     

    A-friend

    Senior Member
    Persian (Farsi)
    Thank you Miss Julie. I think I have found the best place to find the answers of my questions. I am so happy :)
     

    A-friend

    Senior Member
    Persian (Farsi)
    I read in Longman dictionary of contemporary English that: "the verb inhabit is mainly used in formal or scientific contexts"; so having this information I asked this question. Aprart from the scientific or fomal aspecta, if you agree with the mentioned information inside of the Longman dictionary, so the question is when we can use such a verb? Could you please do me a favor and give me some examples?
     

    tepatria

    Senior Member
    Canadian English
    The Inuit inhabit the northern parts of Canada.
    I'm wracking my brains to think of more examples, but they all have to do with living somewhere.
    Can you do a spell check before posting? It would help make your questions clearer to me (and to others I hope).
     

    e2efour

    Senior Member
    UK English
    Two other words for to live are reside and be domiciled.
    In which country do you reside?
    is a possible question, though it is unlikely to be used in speech as it sounds rather formal.
    Similarly, you could say Where are you domiciled? However, this is the sort of question that a tax lawyer would ask you!
     
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    Edinburgher

    Senior Member
    German/English bilingual
    The trouble with 'inhabit' is that it's transitive. It requires an object. You can inhabit tepatria's "northern parts of Canada", or you can inhabit bamboo huts, or caves.
    So you can't ask "Where do you inhabit?" because there is no object. At a push, you could ask "What do you inhabit?", to which the answer might be "I inhabit a large bungalow."
    But that's probably not what you're wanting to ask. Generally, "inhabiting" it what categories of people or animals do, not what individuals do.

    Bottom line: Inhabiting is not a synonym for living, because living is intransitive.

    In some places stay is used as a synonym for live. Where I live, people often ask "Where do you stay?" when they want to know either your exact address or just roughly in what area you live.

    You mention domicile. It depends on context, but this word tends not to mean what address I live at, but what country I live in (other than temporarily).
     

    A-friend

    Senior Member
    Persian (Farsi)
    I am really appreciative for your assistance dears. Your answers were absolutely what I needed :)
     
    Last edited:

    Kotuku33

    Senior Member
    French & English, Alberta, Canada
    Regarding "inhabit", to add to what's already been correctly said, I think it implies a habitat (which is related to the word inhabit). If you aren't referring to a habitat, then inhabit isn't the word you want. For a formal turn of phrase I do like "Where do you reside?" But it really is very formal. "Where do you live?" is probably what most people would say.
     

    A-friend

    Senior Member
    Persian (Farsi)
    And what about this verb's family words and working with them?
    For example are the following questions correct?
    1) Inhabitation in Syria sounds impossible
    2) I guess Syria is uninhabitable place these days
    are they also too formal and a unusable in everyday English speaking?
     

    Kotuku33

    Senior Member
    French & English, Alberta, Canada
    Hi again - for me to understand the first one I think I would need more context. The second one sounds good and is perfectly plausible as something someone would say. The sentence is saying that the habitat, environment in Syria is not conducive to people living there at the moment. It's a comment on how bad general conditions are at the moment. Don't forget to say that it "is an uninhabitable place".

    One can also say that a house is uninhabitable if it is in such bad condition that people could not safely live in it.
     

    Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    1) Inhabitation in Syria sounds impossible
    2) I guess Syria is uninhabitable place these days
    are they also too formal and a unusable in everyday English speaking?
    Inhabit and uninhabitable are normal, everyday words. On the other hand, I had to look up "inhabitation" to be sure it is a word - I can't remember ever seeing it before. It's not in Firefox's spell checker.
     

    A-friend

    Senior Member
    Persian (Farsi)
    Hi dear Kotuku33
    regarding to the first one, let’s suppose that someone needs to inform about the living conditions of the abovementioned country in last months. Having a little political information they can get to the fact that such a country is not a suitable place for living and in this manner wants to let someone know about the current situations in Syria. So is it possible to use the first predicative question or maybe in the following form? "There are very low facilities for inhabitation in Syria these days"
     

    A-friend

    Senior Member
    Persian (Farsi)
    Dear Myridon
    Then could you please let me know what is the name for the verb "Inhabit"? I don't want to make a name by adding "ing" at the end.
     

    Kotuku33

    Senior Member
    French & English, Alberta, Canada
    "There are very low facilities for inhabitation in Syria these days" does not seem like an idiomatic expression in English. Try it in a completely different way, like "Living conditions in Syria these days are abysmal" (or "very poor"). I too had to look up "inhabitation" in the dictionary. It is a word, but it doesn't have the meaning you are looking for. See here.
     
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