don´t have or haven´t got

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johnmiller

Member
Spanish - Spain
Hello, was is the right one, please?

"I don´t have a lot of money so I can´t afford...."

"I haven´t got a lot of money so I can´t afford...."




Thank you in advance!!

:)
 
  • Giordano Bruno

    Senior Member
    English, England
    John,

    A word of warning about the overuse of the verb to get. It can be used just about anywhere.

    "He got up, got dressed and got himself breakfast, then he got a bus to the office. As soon as he got there, he got a phone call..." You get my meaning?

    In formal English, the "got" in "I haven't got..." is redundant and should be avoided. Nonetheless, I believe that Queen Victoria is right about common usage.
     

    DavyBCN

    Senior Member
    UK - English
    John,

    A word of warning about the overuse of the verb to get. It can be used just about anywhere.

    "He got up, got dressed and got himself breakfast, then he got a bus to the office. As soon as he got there, he got a phone call..." You get my meaning?

    In formal English, the "got" in "I haven't got..." is redundant and should be avoided. Nonetheless, I believe that Queen Victoria is right about common usage.
    Hm. I know you said "in formal English", but I am not sure I agree that it is redundant and should be avoided, even though I also agree on the possible overuse of got. Both have and got are verbs used in this sense to mean possession of something, and the examples are (both negative of course) the present simple of have and the present perfect of got. I do not possess any money would be formal to me. There doesn't seem much difference between the other two in this respect.
     
    I agree with Giordano's note of caution in using "got".

    When I was at school, many years ago, we were taught that "got" was "an ugly, unnecessary, word and should be avoided". "I haven't a lot of money" sounded far better than "I haven't got a lot of money."






    LRV
     

    API003

    Member
    Spain Spanish
    As far as I know, I don't have is more used in AE, am I wrong?

    To me, at speaking it's much more easy and fast to say than I haven't got.
    Perhaps I haven't...
     

    mariposita

    Senior Member
    US, English
    As far as I know, I don't have is used more in AE, am I wrong?

    For me, at when speaking, it's much more easier and faster to say than I haven't got.
    Perhaps I haven't...
    I can't say for sure which is used more, but in AE, I haven't got is definitely of a lower register than I don't have. That is, it is less formal and less correct (particularly in writing). I believe this is because our preferred past participle for the verb to get is gotten, not got.
     

    Porteño

    Member Emeritus
    British English
    I have always considered that a person who uses the plain version of 'I have' or 'I haven't' without 'got' was a purist and such usage was limited to professors, except of course in formal written English when it should be avoided. 'Do you have?' originated in AE (I believe) but the influence of TV has introduced it into BE where it is now in common use.
     

    API003

    Member
    Spain Spanish
    I can't say for sure which is used more, but in AE, I haven't got is definitely of a lower register than I don't have. That is, it is less formal and less correct (particularly in writing). I believe this is because our preferred past participle for the verb to get is gotten, not got.
    Thanks for correcting my previous post, and for your opinion :)
    I used to think that I don't have was colloquial, and less correct that I haven't got.
    This means I'll use I don't have much more from now on :)
     

    vapourmile

    New Member
    English
    I disagree with "I haven't a lot of money" sounding better than "I haven't got a lot of money". It only drops a verb and doesn't add value. Because the verb is conspicuously missing, one wonders "You haven't What a lot of money? You haven't Won a lot of money? You havem't Stolen a lot of money?".

    For me the crucial difference that nobody has yet mentioned, which can be conspicuous to the specific circumstances, is that "got" suggests the noun is within your grasp, and "have"implies ownership. Therefore, "I haven't got my own set of clubs" is not identical in meaning as "I don't have my own set of golf clubs". The first suggests you haven't brought such a thing with you, while the second implies you simply don't own such a thing at all. In the first instance, you might Own more than one set of clubs, in the second, it says you don't Own any full sets of golf clubs.

    However, "Have" suggests willing while "got" suggests finality. "I don't have much money" suggests you'd be willing to offer some under the right circumstances. "I haven't got much money" is more effective when supplying a reason why you wish not to contribute at all.

    I recommend avoiding "I haven't a lot of money" because of the missing verb. It avoids the sharpness of "I haven't got" but sounds pretentious. If you "haven't got a lot of money, you can say neither "I haven't got a lot..." nor "I haven't a lot...", by saying "I don't have a lot of..." instead.

    I emphatically agree with the contributor who wrote that "I do not have", will, in any case with ambivalent intention, sound better than "I have not got". The latter will certainly sound like lower English.

    Think about it: "To have" is when "To get" is in the past. You "have" something generally only after you have "got" it. It suggests present tense state of ownership, rather than the past tense act of actually going out to "get" it so that you can "have" it.
     

    sdgraham

    Senior Member
    USA English
    I hate to encourage the re-awakening of an eight-year-old thread that previously was put nicely to bed, but "haven't got" is still less preferable to than "haven't," at least in the minds of those of us who care about the language.

    It's fascinating to note that we've seen a number of posters who claim that the good English our generation learned at all levels of schooling sounds "pretentious."

    They are, of course, entitled to their view of the world.
     
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