Donator

Stephanagreg

Senior Member
FRANCE FRENCH
Hello,

Could I ask you what difference you would make between a "donator" and a "donor" (with the meaning :someone who gives money to a political party, for instance) ?

I would have thought "donator" occurred more frequently in American English (the reason for this being that I am basically more familiar with British English and not used to using "donator"), but a Google search seems to invalidate this.

Thanks for whatever help you might provide me with.

Stephan
 
  • lizzeymac

    Senior Member
    English - USA
    Stephanagreg said:
    Hello,

    Could I ask you what difference you would make between a "donator" and a "donor" (with the meaning :someone who gives money to a political party, for instance) ?

    I would have thought "donator" occurred more frequently in American English (the reason for this being that I am basically more familiar with British English and am not used to using "donator"), but a Google search seems to invalidate this.

    Thanks for whatever help you might provide me with.

    Stephan

    Hello -
    I have never heard or seen "Donator" used in American English.
    I have seen it on websites in French & German & Finnish & Swedish, or in the "English" translations of foreign language websites.
    I am surprised to see that it is in the online Roget's Thesaurus 3rd ed. 1995 & American Heritage Dictionary - we don't use it.
    If you look at the Google for "donator" again, you will see that almost all cites are from non-English sources.
    "Donor" is used in AE.
    Bye,
     

    emma42

    Senior Member
    British English
    Hello, Stephana. Much to my surprise, my Chambers Dictionary does have "donator" as a synonym for "donor". However, I have never heard the word used. It is always "donor" in British English, as far as I'm concerned.
     

    suzi br

    Senior Member
    English / England
    lizzeymac said:
    Hello -
    you will see that almost all cites are from non-English sources.

    This is a good point, to remind us to be cautious when searching with Google; always look at the source of the example.

    I agree, I would always use donor and never use donator yet I can see that donator seems more logical, adding the sufix to the verb stem "donate" or back forming from "donation".
     

    lizzeymac

    Senior Member
    English - USA
    suzi br said:
    This is a good point, to remind us to be cautious when searching with Google; always look at the source of the example.

    I agree, I would always use donor and never use donator yet I can see that donator seems more logical, adding the sufix to the verb stem "donate" or back forming from "donation".

    Perhaps this explains the formation -
    donor
    c.1439, from Anglo-Fr. donour, from O.Fr. doneur, from L. donatorem (nom. donator), from donare "give as a gift." Of blood, from 1910; of organs or tissues, from 1918.
     
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