'' Don't cast your evil eyes " or don't curse ''.

hectacon

Senior Member
Hindi
What is native expression of this .

Suppose someone is doing a thing quite well . or if a machine is functioning quite well even it being very old. If someone is playing a video game or doing similar thing. and if someone start praising that machine/equipment or person . But that person is wary about his praise . He wants to say something which I don't know how to say in English. '' Don't cast your evil eyes " or don't curse ''.

And if that person suddenly after the praise does a mistake . What would a native speaker say?
 
  • velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
    Don't jinx me.
    (Only a superstitious person would be likely to say this. It would be more likely for a westerner to say something like: "Be quiet! You're putting me off.")


    You jinxed me! You put me off.
     

    dermott

    Senior Member
    B.E. via Australian English
    In the context of someone doing well - playing a video game, for example - they might say, "Don't jinx me". If the praise continues, and a mistake occurs, they might say, "See what you did! You jinxed me!".
     

    hectacon

    Senior Member
    Hindi
    In the context of someone doing well - playing a video game, for example - they might say, "Don't jinx me". If the praise continues, and a mistake occurs, they might say, "See what you did! You jinxed me!".
    so It is different from casting an evil eye.
     

    velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
    In the West we don't usually talk about the evil eye, because it isn't a common superstition. Many people wouldn't know what it really means.
     

    You little ripper!

    Senior Member
    Australian English
    If we do use the expression 'to give someone the evil eye' it's not because we're superstitious - it simply means that we're glaring at them because we're angry.
     

    velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
    If we do use the expression 'to give someone the evil eye' it's not because we're superstitious - it simply means that we're glaring at someone because we're angry with them.
    In my experience we don't talk about the evil eye at all. I've not heard it used in the way you suggest, Ylr. People who use it in that way don't actually believe in the power of the evil eye. It's used differently in societies where the belief exists and the evil eye is genuinely feared.
     

    You little ripper!

    Senior Member
    Australian English
    In my experience we don't talk about the evil eye at all. I've not heard it used in the way you suggest, Ylr. People who use it in that way don't actually believe in the power of the evil eye. It's used differently in societies where the belief exists and the evil eye is genuinely feared.
    You do hear it in Australia, vel, but as I said earlier it simply means that you're angry with the person being referred to. :)
     

    You little ripper!

    Senior Member
    Australian English
    Evil eye - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    Among those who do not take the evil eye literally, either by reason of the culture in which they were raised or because they simply do not believe it, the phrase, "to give someone the evil eye" usually means simply to glare at the person in anger or disgust. The term has entered into common usage within the English language. Within the broadcasting industry it refers to when a presenter signals to the interviewee or co-presenter to stop talking due to a shortage of time.[10]
     
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