"don't count on it" vs "you'd be surprised"

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WritingAPuppy

Senior Member
canada mandarin
Hi. What's the exact difference between these two? For example, if i am in the car with someone and I say to him, "since you've lived in Vancouver for 6 years, you know how to get back to downtown, right"?

So what's the best reply here, "don't count on it", or "you'd be surprised"? And why for your choice? I need to know when is the best time to use either..

Thanks.
 
  • Dimcl

    Senior Member
    Canadian English
    Hi. What's the exact difference between these two? For example, if I am in the car with someone and I say to him, "Since you've lived in Vancouver for 6 years, you know how to get back to downtown, right"?

    So what's the best reply here, "Don't count on it", or "You'd be surprised"? And why for your choice? I need to know when is the best time to use either..

    Thanks.
    Well, this is an odd example, indeed. Only if your friend does not know how to get downtown would he say "Don't count on it" which means "Don't depend/rely on my knowledge". If I asked someone this and he responded "You'd be surprised", I wouldn't have the vaguest idea of whether he knows or not because it's a non-answer.

    You ask what the "best reply" is here. My answer is neither because they are both odd responses to a simple yes or no question.
     
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