Don't get used to it Vs Don't make a habit of it

Xavier da Silva

Senior Member
Hello everyone,

Is ''don't get used to it'' interchangeable with ''don't make a habit of it'' meaning "you shouldn't ask for it always because I might not do it for you again" in the example I made below?

John: Anna, could you help me with my homework tonight?
Anna: John, I'm really busy, but I'll do it for you. But look, don't get used to it. Vs don't make a habit of it. Next time I might not be able to help you.

Thank you in advance!
 
  • lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Yes, they have much the same meaning. But of course they can be used differently:

    "Can I borrow your car?" "Yes, but don't make a habit of it." (The asker is doing something but mustn't do it too often.)

    "Thank you for letting me borrow your car." "That's okay. But don't get used to it." (It's not something that can happen all the time.)
     

    Lun-14

    Banned
    Hindi
    "Can I borrow your car?" "Yes, but don't make a habit of it." (The asker is doing something but mustn't do it too often.)

    "Thank you for letting me borrow your car." "That's okay. But don't get used to it." (It's not something that can happen all the time.)
    Hi. Could you please rephrase both expressions here in these examples?
     

    Egmont

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    "Don't make a habit of it" refers only to something that a person does. Example: "It's OK to use the dish towel to dry your hair this time, but don't make a habit of it."

    "Don't get used to it" usually refers to something that someone else does to or for a person. Example: "I helped you with your homework this time, but don't get used to it." It can also be used as in the previous example, but that is not common.
     

    Sparky Malarky

    Moderator
    English - US
    "Don't make a habit of it" refers only to something that a person does. Example: "It's OK to use the dish towel to dry your hair this time, but don't make a habit of it."

    "Don't get used to it" usually refers to something that someone else does to or for a person. Example: "I helped you with your homework this time, but don't get used to it." It can also be used as in the previous example, but that is not common.
    Exactly. "Don't make a habit of [some action]" and "Don't get used to [some privilege]" mean completely different things, but they have the same effect in the original example.
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top