Don't go on the roadway

takiakos76

Senior Member
Hungarian
Hi!

If my understanding is correct, roadway is the part of a road/street the cars go on. I.e., road = roadway + sidewalk.
But how often do you use that for that part of the road in everyday speech? Do you say e.g.,
"When you're on foot, stay on the sidewalk, don't go on the roadway!"
(Or do you just say "don't go on the road"? Does that mean the same?)


Thanks!
 
  • dojibear

    Senior Member
    English - Northeast US
    In the US we warn kids not to go into the road. The word "roadway" is used, but is not common (in areas where I have lived).

    "Street" is also used. Sometimes it means just the part the cars use ("stay out of the street, kids") and sometimes it includes the sidewalk ("I was walking down the street").
     

    takiakos76

    Senior Member
    Hungarian
    Thanks, that's pretty much what I suspected...

    Except: does this mean that in general you drive/walk ON this or that road/street (at least in AE), but when you refer to the roadway part, you go INTO and stay OUT OF the road/street?
     

    RM1(SS)

    Senior Member
    English - US (Midwest)
    Direction of movement.

    If you're moving from a point not in the street toward the middle of it, you're going into it. If you're travelling along the length of it, then you're travelling on it.
     

    Hermione Golightly

    Senior Member
    British English
    'Don't go on/onto the road' would be normal BE. It means don't go (walk) on that part of the road/street/avenue/ so-on and so-forth/ that the traffic goes (drives) on. Stay on the part reserved for pedestrians.
    There are some contexts when I would use 'roadway' for emphasis. For example, "Far too many vehicles are parking off the roadway, on the pavements and footpaths, making life difficult for pedestrians ".
     

    takiakos76

    Senior Member
    Hungarian
    One more thing: can you also say: "don't go too close to the street, there are cars there", meaning actually staying on the sidewalk, and not going close to the roadway?

    Thanks!
     

    DonnyB

    Sixties Mod
    English UK Southern Standard English
    I'd say (in BE) "Don't get too close to the road....", meaning the bit that the cars drive on, even if the particular "road" in question was actually called a "street". Sorry if that sounds confusing. :oops:
     

    RM1(SS)

    Senior Member
    English - US (Midwest)
    One more thing: can you also say: "don't go too close to the street, there are cars there", meaning actually staying on the sidewalk, and not going close to the roadway?
    Yes. I might use road instead, like Donny -- I don't think I have a real preference.
     
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