Don't let me have to get up!

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csicska

Senior Member
hungarian
Hello. If a child doesn't want to listen to its mother's requests and continues in its provoking activity, can a mother sitting and watching TV say something like "Don't let me have to get up (and make you do what I asked you to do politely while sitting and watching TV)? Thank you.

Example:
Mother - Eric, turn down the radio a bit. It's really loud.
Eric - I like it like this.
Mother - I said turn it down! Don't let me have to get up!
 
  • Hermione Golightly

    Senior Member
    British English
    We would say "Don't make me get up."
    Me too, but I don't find 'let me' wrong, just a bit peculiar. Possibly it's just a question of idiom, what do they call it, 'idiolect'? Or a colloquial variation. I usually agree with lingobingo.
     

    csicska

    Senior Member
    hungarian
    Thank you. Would there be a big difference between "Don't make me get up" and "Don't make me have to get up"? Perhaps, redundancy of "have to"?
     

    lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Thank you. Would there be a big difference between "Don't make me get up" and "Don't make me have to get up"? Perhaps, redundancy of "have to"?
    It’s far from redundant. On the contrary, let or make me “have to” makes the expression more menacing, in the context of “don’t try my patience any more, I’ve had enough”.

    Don’t make me have to come over there and ……
    Tell me what happened! Don’t let me have to drag it out of you.
    Don’t let me have to tell you again. Do it now!
     
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