Don't make friendship with bad boys

Roymalika

Senior Member
Punjabi
A parent advises their son:
Don't make friendship with bad boys.


Is the underlined idiomatic?
 
  • PaulQ

    Banned
    UK
    English - England
    1. It would be Don't make friendships with bad boys.
    but
    (i) in this context, nobody would say "Don't make friendships"
    (ii) It is highly unlikely that anyone would say "bad boys".
     

    Roymalika

    Senior Member
    Punjabi
    1. It would be Don't make friendships with bad boys.
    but
    (i) in this context, nobody would say "Don't make friendships"
    (ii) It is highly unlikely that anyone would say "bad boys".
    I am translating from my native language Punjabi.
    Do you mean to say that "make friendship(s) with someone" is not idiomatic?
     

    lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    To make friends with someone is to become their friend in the first place. Only then can you say that you are their friend / are friends with them.

    It’s not advisable to use the term “bad boys”. If someone is described as a “bad boy”, it tends to be meant as a sort of compliment.
     

    Roxxxannne

    Senior Member
    English (northeastern US)
    Yes, it is. Lingobingo is explaining the difference between 'make friends' and 'be friends.'
    "To make friends with someone is to become their friend in the first place." = the meaning of 'make friends'
    "Only then can you say that you are their friend / are friends with them." = the meaning of 'be friends.' 'Are' is a form of the verb 'be.'
     
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