Don't rush yourself

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Silver

Senior Member
Chinese,Cantonese,Sichuan dialect
Hi,

Let's say I have a friend who's very nice and he helps me with my questions from time to time. Since we exchange ideas online, and sometimes I think my questions are too many, I hope he don't need to answer them soon. I don't want him to feel that I am waiting for his answers all the time and I want him to be easy with it. Can I say:

Don't rush yourself. (You don't need to rush yourself to answer my questions, please just do that when you're free.)

Thanks a lot
 
  • dojibear

    Senior Member
    English - Northeast US
    Many English verbs can be used as a transitive verb (with an object) and also as an intransitive verb (no object).

    For this meaning, AE speakers use the intransitive "rush". We say "Don't rush" meaning don't hurry, do it when you are free.

    Your example uses the transitive verb "rush", with the object "yourself". That is unusual and sounds odd. We can say you "rush" someone else (you pester them, point out the time, urge them to hurry) but not yourself.
     

    Silver

    Senior Member
    Chinese,Cantonese,Sichuan dialect
    Thanks a lot, Heypresto, Dojibear and Dale.

    or the set-phrase friendly imperative "Take your time."
    Good point, I don't want to use it anymore, I used it to that friend many a time, I myself feel a bit sick of using it.:(
     
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