Don't stint us!

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susanna76

Senior Member
Romanian
Is "Don't stint us" commonly used? As in tell us everything, don't keep details from us, don't "restrict/limit" your story?

Here's from Martin Amis, The Pregnant Widow:

'Spin this out, Scheherezade, if you wouldn't mind. Any chance details. Don't stint us.'
'Well. The first thing she did was almost drown in the indoor pool. . . .'

Thank you!
 
  • PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    I rarely, if ever, use the verb but may use it as a noun, e.g. "He did a stint in prison."
     

    Beryl from Northallerton

    Senior Member
    British English
    It's quite uncommon in usage in my opinion. Especially the above form. You might hear "and no stinting on the details (say)", but not "don't stint us".
     
    Last edited:

    natkretep

    Moderato con anima (English Only)
    English (Singapore/UK), basic Chinese
    As others said, I think it is not very common. More common would be constructions like, 'Don't stint on the details' (with on), 'They didn't stint themselves' (with a reflexive). You will notice that I associate stint with a negative sentence.

    PaulQ's noun stint is a little different (meaning 'a short term').
     

    susanna76

    Senior Member
    Romanian
    Thank you all for your very useful comments. I also use "stint" as a noun and I have seen it often as a verb but didn't recall the exact phrasing. "Don't still on the details" and "No stinting on the details" both sound great. I don't remember seeing the reflexive though. Can I use "they didn't stint themselves" to say something like "The booze was free for the taking, and they didn't stint themselves"?

    Thanks, again, to all three of you!
     

    Shandol

    Senior Member
    Persian - پارسی
    Hello there,
    It really is a completion of something that gives me strength in my work, to be able to go and explore and do things, and also it stints me in certain things about what I would do, because I have children now.
    Lexico dictionary

    By reading the above I got the impression that the bold part does sound uncommon and perhaps to some degree unnatural to you. Well, I suppose a more natural way of saying it would be: <the use of reflexive pronoun>
    ... and also I stint myself in certain things ...

    But, the problem with the amendment is that it kind of change the meaning of the sentence! Do you agree? Is there any way to alter the original to a more natural form without losing the meaning?
    Thanks.
     

    velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
    It sounds very odd to me, but unfortunately we don't know what the sentence refers to. "Stints me" here seems to mean "restricts me", and "and" perhaps means "but"(?) It doesn't suggest to me that the writer deliberately deprives himself of (stint myself in) certain things.

    It's rather futile to worry about dictionary examples of unknown origin. Can't you find an example from a text?
     

    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    This appears to be the source of the quote in post 8: CNN.com - Transcripts.
    Note the comment at the top of the page:
    THIS IS A RUSH TRANSCRIPT. THIS COPY MAY NOT BE IN ITS FINAL FORM AND MAY BE UPDATED.
    I'd say that "stints" there was a mistranscription. She probably said "restricts".
    It's rather futile to worry about dictionary examples of unknown origin. Can't you find an example from a text?
    Hear, hear!:)
     
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    velisarius

    Senior Member
    British English (Sussex)
    Thanks for finding context, Loob.:)

    [It's not worth studying rushed transcripts either :D Note Larry King's previous question there:
    KING: You're how are you old now? ]:p
     

    Shandol

    Senior Member
    Persian - پارسی
    Thank you both.
    Can't you find an example from a text?
    I've just found some context:
    At Le Mans, it’s now compulsory for each car to have three drivers – each must spend at least six hours at the wheel, but must not drive more than four hours within any six, and must not drive for more than 14 hours over the entire distance. Last year, the longest time behind the wheel in the winning car was for Neel Jani with nine hours and 24 minutes. So, I’ve out stinted him.
    Going the distance: Le Mans race length in Porsche's sports cars
    Any thought.
    Hear, hear!:)
    I am all ears. :)
     

    Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    Personally I would have used "skimp", a much more common verb. I did look up "skimp" in the thesaurus and they list "stint" as a synonym.

    But still "skimp" would be my preference.
     

    Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    I've out-stinted him. I've spent a longer stint in the car than he did. The speaker has verbed the noun meaning of "stint."
    You are able to get that from the O.P.'s quote? Or do you have a longer quote to look at?
     

    Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    The quoted section is comparing times behind the wheel.
    I am not arguing your conclusion, but I think you must have information that is not shown in this thread. I do not see a reference to driving, even when visiting Loob's link.

    Loob's link reveals this:

    ZETA-JONES: It's a great age. And it came at the right time, albeit the baby arrived before we got married, and it was a little bit the wrong way around. But I just love it. It really is a completion of something that gives me strength in my work, to be able to go and explore and do things, and also it stints me in certain things about what I would do, because I have children now.
     

    Shandol

    Senior Member
    Persian - پارسی
    It is worthwhile to clarify that my question is not circumscribed to that particular quote/context mentioned in #8.
    My question is all about the construction.
    ===================================================
    I've out-stinted him. I've spent a longer stint in the car than he did. The speaker has verbed the noun meaning of "stint."
    Is it natural and idiomatic?
    ===================================================
    Let me give it another try:
    Doesn't he know the severity of the Republic's laws?” “How should he, being a Castilian?” “But theft is theft, in Venice or Castile. Was he in need that he should have run this dreadful risk?” “Scarcely that, since I have worked for both of us.” There was a hint of bitterness in the reply. “But perhaps I stinted him.
    Columbus - Raphael Sabatini
    ===================================================
    But still "skimp" would be my preference.
    Does it work here? To use "skimp" instead of "stint"?
    ===================================================
    Thank you all.
     

    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    Mnemon, there are too many different examples and the thread is losing coherence:(.
    Post 1 has been answered by posts 3 and 4.
    Post 8 has been answered by posts 9 and 10.
    Post 12 has been answered by post 14.

    General observations on the use of the verb are also given in posts 3 and 4. You can spend your whole life without needing to use the verb stint; I'm sure many people do.
     

    Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    It is a parallel construction to:

    "I've out-foxed you" (I am slyer than you)

    "I've out-smarted you" (I am more clever than you)

    "I've out-gunned you" (my arsenal is more powerful than yours)


    So if you are asking if the construction is idiomatic, it is as far as the construction goes. It is not an idiomatic use of the vocabulary however.
     

    Shandol

    Senior Member
    Persian - پارسی
    General observations on the use of the verb are also given in posts 3 and 4. You can spend your whole life without needing to use the verb stint; I'm sure many people do.
    I think you are right, Loob. Therefor, I'll call a halt.
    ==========================================
    It is a parallel construction to:

    "I've out-foxed you" (I am slyer than you)

    "I've out-smarted you" (I am more clever than you)

    "I've out-gunned you" (my arsenal is more powerful than yours)


    So if you are asking if the construction is idiomatic, it is as far as the construction goes. It is not an idiomatic use of the vocabulary however.
    Thanks Packard.
     
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