Don't trip.

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JungKim

Senior Member
Korean
The movie 'Black Panther' has this line (more quotes):
Museum Guide: I beg your pardon?

Killmonger: It was taken by British Soldiers in Benin, but it’s from Wakanda, and it’s made out of vibranium.

Killmonger: [to the lady in the museum] Don’t trip. I’mma take it off your hands for you.
What does 'trip' here mean?
 
  • RH unabridged:
    {trip}
    21 to be under the influence of a hallucinogenic drug, esp. LSD (often fol. by out):

    Metaphorically, then, to go crazy, lose control, 'freak out'.

    Similarly, "freak" in Oxford online:

    informal--- Behave or cause to behave in a wild and irrational way, typically because of the effects of extreme emotion or drugs.

    no object-- ‘he freaked out and smashed the place up’
     

    JungKim

    Senior Member
    Korean
    Bennymix, that definition I was able to find in any dictionary, but I didn't think it was applied here.
    Although your reasoning does make sense, I'm not sure if this slangy use should be subsumed under the definition you cited.
     

    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    Here's how the Cassell's Dictionary of Slang explains this use of trip, JungKim:
    trip v.2 [1980s+] 1 (US Black) to lose control, to go mad, to act under a misapprehension. 2 to be delighted, to be ecstatic, often as trip for, trip over. 3 to be passionately interested or involved in.

    It gives the derivation as fig. non-drug uses of TRIP v.1; the latter is defined as
    trip v.1 [1960s+] 1 (drugs) to take LSD.
     

    suzi br

    Senior Member
    English / England
    Thanks. Is this use of 'trip' well known in informal settings?
    It’s well known amongst those who use it like this.

    It’s not well known by me, for instance, I just learned it.
    I wont be using it. That dictionary describes as US black. It would sound silly coming from me.

    I was familiar with the 1960s notion of an LSD-induced trip (which this current use has evolved from). I am not involved in any drug culture and have not heard this used recently. Maybe drug-users have other slang, 50 years on? That’s what I’d expect.
     
    It’s well known amongst those who use it like this.

    It’s not well known by me, for instance, I just learned it.
    I wont be using it. That dictionary describes as US black. It would sound silly coming from me.

    I was familiar with the 1960s notion of an LSD-induced trip (which this current use has evolved from). I am not involved in any drug culture and have not heard this used recently. Maybe drug-users have other slang, 50 years on? That’s what I’d expect.
    If you haven't seen Black Panther, some of it takes places in the 60s with scenes having US black people, hence the word choice.
     
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