door police (trendy nightclubs)

Macunaíma

Senior Member
português, Brasil
The term door police is used in Brazil (in English, as a borrowing) to describe the practice by fashionable nightclubs to place someone from their staff (called host or hostess) to select who of those waiting outside will be allowed to go in, or, as they say, who "meets the profile of the party". People who are not considered stylish enough, good-looking enough or young enough are barred from entering or kept out with the excuse that the house is full until they give up and go somewhere else. This practice is not very common around here, but I know it is in Europe and, in the US, in NY, at least. I googled the expression but apparently the term is mostly used by non-English speakers. I hear both the practice and the name come from the 1970's New York nightclubs, like Studio 54. Is it really known as door police by native speakers? If not, how's this practice known as where you live?

Thanks in advance.
 
  • GreenWhiteBlue

    Senior Member
    USA - English
    "Door police" is not a term used by native English speakers.

    The person who decides who gets past the velvet rope into a trendy New York club is the "doorman".

    A "bouncer" typically does not make the determination of who gets in, but keeps order in the club and ejects anyone who behaves badly.
     

    Macunaíma

    Senior Member
    português, Brasil
    Aren't bouncers those well-built security guards who make sure no one breaks the house rules and throw them out if they do? Aren't there different names for the person who picks out who will come in and who does the job of dealing with clients who, say, get drunk and start a fight? The person at the door might be a model-type, designer-clad woman, for example. Should I refer to her as a bouncer?

    EDIT: I posted this before seeing GWB's post. Thank you GWB!

    Do you know a specific name for this practice?
     

    Sepia

    Senior Member
    High German/Danish
    We call ourselves doormen or security. F would be doorwoman/female security guard. If her job is only to check the guest list and leave security to others, hostess would be apporpriate.

    Doormen come in all sizes. I am not particularly big, and I've worked at the door for several years. Size can be an advantage, but there are other points that count, like how you handle people in general and if you can fight. Some smaller guys are good fighters and many big guys are not.
    Maintaining the image of the club is also important, although the main concern in most cases is security.
     

    sarahjuanita

    Member
    England, English
    We do have something in England called 'door poilicy' but that's not really anything to do with how attractive or trendy you are, rather to the type of clothes you can or can't wear - nightclubs will usually have a sign saying Door Policy: no trainers, no baseball hats etc but those rules would just be enforced by the bouncers/security people rather than 'door police'.
     

    Brioche

    Senior Member
    Australia English
    The term door police is used in Brazil (in English, as a borrowing). Is it really known as door police by native speakers? If not, how's this practice known as where you live?

    Thanks in advance.
    The official term used in Australia is "Crowd controller".

    The rules vary a bit from state to state, but a "crowd controller" has to have a Private Security licence.

    Unofficially such people are generally called "bouncers".
     

    Sepia

    Senior Member
    High German/Danish
    The official term used in Australia is "Crowd controller".

    The rules vary a bit from state to state, but a "crowd controller" has to have a Private Security licence.

    Unofficially such people are generally called "bouncers".
    Same thing in Germany. You need a licence for security work. Some Scandinavian countries have similar rules.
     

    Matching Mole

    Senior Member
    England, English
    Such a person is known, in certain circles, in Britain, as a "door whore". Some clubs have such greeters, but most do not, they tend to be club scene "personalities" who are often involved in the creation and promotion of the night. They give the club a "front" and a personality. Most clubs just have "bouncers", they are commonly called "security" in the UK.
     
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