Do's and don'ts for a healthy diet

M_07

Senior Member
Italian
Ciao a tutti, non riesco a capire cosa vuol dire questa frase.

Do's and dont's for a healty diet.

Poi c'è uno schema su cosa fare e non fare per una corretta alimentazione.
Non ho mai sentito questo "do's and dont's."
Significa forse "fare e non fare"?

Grazie mille.

 
  • IrishStar

    Senior Member
    Italian
    Ciao a tutti, non riesco a capire cosa vuol dire questa frase.

    Do's and dont's for a healty diet.

    Poi c'è uno schema su cosa fare e non fare per una corretta alimentazione.
    Non ho mai sentito questo "do's and dont's."
    Significa forse "fare e non fare"?

    Grazie mille.
    Sì, significa cose da fare (do's) e cose da non fare (dont's).
     

    Heracleum

    Senior Member
    Italy - Italian
    it:
    Capisco la perplessità di Marzia perché in effetti indicati così "do's and dont's" paiono genitivi sassoni.
    Mentre devo dire di aver incontrato (quasi più) spesso la forma:
    "dos and donts"
    che personalmente mi sembra molto più logica, visto che quelle "s" indicano solo il plurale. No?

    en:
    (question for the natives)
    Which is the more correct form:
    "dos and donts"
    or
    "do's and dont's"
    ?
    (in the above italian comment I was supposing it is better to say as the "dos and donts" since the "s" indicate plural and not the genitive case)
    Thank you.
     

    DesertCat

    Senior Member
    inglese | English
    If you google it seems evenly split between the use of dos or do's (although dos looks very funny to me). However, the apostrophe is necessary with don'ts because it is the contraction of do nots.
     

    Katydid

    Member
    United States (AE)
    Do's and don'ts. If you don't add the apostrophe for do's, people read it as "dos"--that is, "two" in Spanish--and it really gets confusing!
     

    TimLA

    Member Emeritus
    English - US
    Vediamo cosa possiamo fare.
    Regola numero uno in inglese (particolarmente AE)!
    Sempre dovresti scrivere e parlare in modo più corto possibile! :)

    "Do's and don't's" è una formula fissa - c'è bisogno di memorizzarla.

    Viene di qualcosa come:

    "These are the things you need to do" ...per fare qualsiasi cosa....
    "_____Plurale_______ you need to do"
    In inglese riusciamo costruire nuovi nomi dai verbi.
    to eat = mangiare
    eats = cibo ("Good Eats"! un famoso programma TV)

    Alora, prendiamo il "do", aggiungiamo un "s" alla fine, ed abbiamo:
    to do = fare
    do's = cose che dovresti fare

    Cambiamo a "don't's".

    Viene di:
    "These are the things you don't need to do"...per fare qualsiasi cosa.
    Plurale, come sai...
    Prendiamo il "don't", aggiungiamo un "s" alla fine, ed abbiamo:
    don't do = non fare
    don't's = le cose che non dovresti fare.

    Ecco...che facile eh? :D
    AE è un bel casino!
     

    Heracleum

    Senior Member
    Italy - Italian
    :confused: Confusion is increasing eheheh

    OK, let's make it simple comparing "dos & donts" with the italian word for tomato/tomatoes:
    "pomodoro/pomodori"
    the etimology of this word is a composite of:
    "pomo" (pome/apple)
    +
    "d'oro" (golden)
    Nowadays it has definitely prevailed the plural form "pomodori", which is more practically applied to the singular "pomodoro" (just as everything else, let's say "gatto"->"gatti", "pandoro"->"pandori"), not considering the plural of the detached main word "pomo" (pomi) but simply the plural of a whole word like others.
    Some time ago it was quite predominant to say the plural as "pomidoro", following a logical sense, as if it was still the detached components "pomi d'oro" (pomo -> pomi), but it was quite difficult to get it as a plural word, that's why "pomodori" prevailed.

    So, following and learning from this "historical" path of such word I would rather consider "(two) donts" as a practical plural for the word "(a) dont" (derived from "don't")... but the us/uk english speakers followed evidently a different logic :)

    Now that I had better searches I found out that it is commonly written as:
    "do's and don'ts"
    (1.770.000!! results against the 406.000 of this topic's title)
    So I guess this is the "correct" form.


    PS: Just if you were wondering... I posted the "pomodori" thing just to
    report a clear
    -I hope- explanation of why we adopted one form instead of another one ;)
     

    Leo57

    Senior Member
    UK English
    Hi there
    It has already been explained, we just make it up!!!
    Personally, I think it should really be : dos (no apostophe) and dont's (following the rule of apostrophe because it should really be ...and the do nots).
    Look at this:
    People who have lots of things, (material things, things that they need or do not need) = they are "the haves"
    People who don't have anything (they perhaps have no money to buy all the things they want/need) = they are "the have nots " ;););)

    Go on work it out, I dare you, I double dare you, I triple dare you!!
    Then laugh at the English!! A pm is on its way to Heracleum, then you will really be confused.

    Ciao
    Leo:)
     

    giovannino

    Senior Member
    Italian, Neapolitan
    I checked in a few BE dictionaries but there seems to be no agreement even among lexicographers!:)

    Dos and don'ts (Shorter Oxford English Dictionary, New Oxford Dictionary of English)

    Do's and don'ts (Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary, Macmillan English Dictionary)

    Dos and don'ts or Do's and don'ts (Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English)

    However none of them seem to accept dont's or don't's.
     

    Heracleum

    Senior Member
    Italy - Italian
    Dos and don'ts is the most logical one in my opinion, I like it!
    even if it keeps the apostrophe of "don't"... at least is coherent.

    Thank you Giovannino!
     

    Leo57

    Senior Member
    UK English
    Dos and don'ts is the most logical one in my opinion, I like it!
    even if it keeps the apostrophe of "don't"... at least it is coherent.

    Thank you Giovannino!
    Hi there
    Yes, thanks Giovannino, of course it makes perfect sense to write it in this way, however, as you can see even the English cannot seem to get the apostrophe in the correct place, including myself!! I know where it goes (honest I do!!;)) Following this rule my own example of the haves and have nots would be written like this: have + s and haven't + s (Please don't use "haven'ts" I am just using it to show the formula)

    Here are a couple of links which may be of interest.

    Plurals_of_symbols_and_initialisms

    Possessive_apostrophe

    Ciao
    Leo:)
     
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