dosage time/timing

meijin

Senior Member
Japanese
Hi, one of the Japanese-English dictionaries I use has an example phrase "keep to the dosage times", suggesting that a pharmacist can say "Please keep to the dosage times" to their customers. What exactly does this "times" mean? Is it "X times a day", "at X o'clock", or "before/after X"? Please see the following conversation I made up.

Pharmacist: Here are your pills. You should take them xxxxxxxxxxxx. Please keep to the dosage times.
Customer: Sorry, could you explaine that again? I wasn't really listening.
Pharmacist: (1) Please take them three times a day. / (2) Please take them at 8 a.m., 2 p.m., and 8 p.m. / (3) Please take them after each meal.


#1 and 2 are so unlikely that I'd be surprised if the "times" didn't mean #3. In other words, the "time" here means "timing". But since "timing" isn't a countable noun, you can't say "timings". Would it sound odd if the pharmacist used the singular and said
"Please keep to the dosage timing"?
 
  • Scrawny goat

    Senior Member
    English - Ireland
    I agree it's an odd example, unlikely to happen in real life. Just remember that pharmacists use the term dosage and forget the rest.
     

    Dretagoto

    Senior Member
    Inglés británico
    I can't see any pharmacist saying this. In medications, "times" means occasions/points in the day, not a specific hour and minute. It's most likely that they would say something like "please take them as directed" or "make sure to take them regularly".

    A label (and therefore a pharmacist) is very likely to say "take X times per day", but will probably have supplemental information, like "after/before meals" etc.
     

    Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    One of my medications says, "Take by mouth two times daily". (It does not specify the times, but I would understand it to be in 12 hour intervals.)
     

    Truffula

    Senior Member
    English - USA
    I think "please keep to the dosage times" means "Please space the medicine equally through the day" so that if your medication says "take two per day" if they did not say that you might take two together in the morning or one morning one evening with the same result. But if they do say that, you need to do the 12 hour intervals that Packard mentions.
     

    Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    I think "please keep to the dosage times" means "Please space the medicine equally through the day" so that if your medication says "take two per day" if they did not say that you might take two together in the morning or one morning one evening with the same result. But if they do say that, you need to do the 12 hour intervals that Packard mentions.
    I just checked the label on my prescription bottle. It says, "TAKE ONE TABLET BY MOUTH TWICE DAILY". (I often wonder how else they think I might take those tablets.:eek:)

    It could just as easily had these instructions: TAKE TWO TABLETS BY MOUTH ONCE DAILY. (In which case I would consume both tablets at one time, once per day at the time of my choosing.)

    Or:

    TAKE TWO TABLETS ONCE DAILY BEFORE BEDTIME
    TAKE TWO TABLETS WITH FOOD ONCE DAILY
     

    Sparky Malarky

    Moderator
    English - US
    I once needed to be on a particularly strong antibiotic. It was to be taken three times a day, with food. My doctor made it a point to advise me that the doses should be taken as close as possible to eight hours apart so as to avoid side effects. This was unusual. Usually they just say "twice a day" or "three times a day."
     
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