double- + adjective

Are these grammatically correct:

Double-frilled georgette cardigan (a cardigan with a two-layer frill around the collar)
Double-belted pants (a pair of pants with 2 belts on them)

Thanks in advance!
 
  • Aardvark01

    Senior Member
    British English (Midlands)
    I would understand the meaning you intended in both examples. In gardening double-flowered plants such as roses and tulips are quite popular.
     

    aasheq

    Senior Member
    English (Estuary)
    If you are targeting a British audience you should of course say "trousers". "Double-belted pants" sounds decidedly ridiculous in this country.
     

    Aardvark01

    Senior Member
    British English (Midlands)
    If you are targeting a British audience you should of course say "trousers". "Double-belted pants" sounds decidedly ridiculous in this country.
    Silly maybe, but double-belted underpants might attract the fetish market. I had just assumed that the American meaning of pants was intended because of the belts, but then maybe Tiphona is considering a range of rubber-wear?
     

    suzi br

    Senior Member
    English / England
    Both the examples are fine. No-one in the UK thinks of trousers when they first read the word pants, so you do need to think of who will be reading this. Whether you opt for American or British you need make sure the rest of the text it consistent.
     
    It's for an international website on Japanese street fashion, so we're using American English.
    The brand I am researching does make use of a lot of crosses and lacing so I guess it does sound like I'm into fetish wear, haha. ;)
     

    suzi br

    Senior Member
    English / England
    Would it?
    Genuine question --- Doesn't slacks sound like something from the 50s on both sides of the Atlantic?
     
    As a Dutch person I had no idea what slacks were until now, so I guess the same would be true for other foreign visitors. There's also pictures with everything, so I think I'll stick with "pants". :)
     

    JustKate

    Moderate Mod
    Would it?
    Genuine question --- Doesn't slacks sound like something from the 50s on both sides of the Atlantic?
    I don't thinks so, but I've been wrong before. I think of slacks as a way to differentiate dressier pants from really casual pants, e.g., jeans. I mean, in AmE, pants can refer to jeans. It doesn't usually, jeans being a fashion staple in and of themselves, but it can. But nobody would call jeans slacks, at least nobody I know.

    Trousers, now, sounds thoroughly old-fashioned to my ear.

    You would certainly never think of slacks being modified to fetish wear!
    :D No. No, that is for sure true!
     

    suzi br

    Senior Member
    English / England
    Thanks Kate.

    Tiphona, I am sure you are best sticking with pants for your audience. British readers can adapt!
     
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