doubling

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papeya

Senior Member
italian
Hello everybody, can someone explain what does this term mean as far as cooking is concerned? Is it the action of growing caused by yeast? Can it be part of a stir-fry procedure? For example, after cutting the vegetables and mixing them, to put them all in the same pot?
Thanks for help.
 
  • Mister Micawber

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    .
    I would thinking that it means either adding twice the amount of ingredient or folding the bread dough / spring roll shell / etc back over itself.

    I think we should wait for a cook-lexicographer, though...
    .
     

    Siberia

    Senior Member
    UK-Wales - English
    Well, dough that has yeast in it can double in size after raising time.
    Rice can also double after cooking in water. I'm not sure about a stir-fry though. Things tend to remain the same size in a stir-fry- at least mine do.
     

    MissFit

    Senior Member
    Doubling in cooking means exactly the same as in any other context--it means increasing by a factor of two. If yeast dough rises to twice its original volume, then it has doubled. If I double a recipe, it means that I have increased the measure of all the ingredients by a factor of two (multiplied by two) in order to yield twice the amount cookies, casserole, cake, etc. If my recipe tells me to cook my rice until it has doubled, then I cook it until it has increased in volume by a factor of two--doubled in volume--by absorbing the liquid.

    In the case of stir-fry, the only way I can think of that vegetables might double is if you use twice as much. Vegetables do not swell when they are sir-fried--they usually shrink a little as the liquid in them is cooked out.
     
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