Dough guy of the Variety Club of Malta

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parasian

Senior Member
French/France
Hello !

I've come across this "title" in a British (comic) movie, but I can't figured out if it's supposed to be humoristic or not, and if it is, where is the comic part.
It comes after a long list of titles :
"Knight Commander of the Grand Cross of Bath, member of the most noble order of St John of Jerusalem, Fellow of the Royal Horticultural Society, Former Dough Guy of the Variety Club of Malta."

Apparently, all the other titles are genuine, but this one sounds strange to me, and I can't find it on Google.

Do I have to understand "Variety Club" as a sort of "variety theater" or does it mean something totally different ?

Is a Dough Guy the same thing as a a doughboy? Could it be a pizza boy?

I'm very lost. Any help or clue is welcome!
Thanks in advance
 
  • Zob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    If I'm not mistaken, the "Dough" refers to the American slang word for money. So, "the Dough Guy" is simply a humorous term for "Treasurer".
     

    . 1

    Banned
    Australian Australia
    There is no doubt that 'the dough guy' of an organisation is an off the cuff reference to the Treasurer.
    Dough is such a common reference for money that it could hardly be anything else under the circumstances.

    .,,
     

    Zob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    Perhaps I should have explained, Parasian, that "The Variety Club" is a charitable organisation run by the entertainment profession and they do a lot of good work, especially for children. I believe branches of the organisation exist in a number of English-speaking countries.
     

    parasian

    Senior Member
    French/France
    Thank you all for your help. It's much clearer now! What I still don't understand though is this : if the Variety Club is indeed a real charity, why would they use American slang just to mean "treasurer" when all the other titles are real titles and very formal?
    I must add, sorry for not mentionning it earlier, that the movie is from the early 60's, that's why I didn't think the meaning of dough = money was relevant. But maybe I am wrong?
    Otherwise, would you say the Variety Club is a charity not taken too seriously because of the involvement of show business people?
    Sorry for all those questions. I'm trying to make sense of this title that puzzles me...
     

    panjandrum

    Lapsed Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    The Variety Club is taken VERY seriously. It raises an great deal of money for many charitable purposes - click on the link I posted earlier to see the kind of things they support:
    For more than 50 years Variety Club Children's Charity has been helping sick, disabled and disadvantaged children.

    We provide Sunshine Coaches, electric wheelchairs, outings to exciting places, equip children's hospitals and help in many other ways. This is made possible because volunteers from many walks of life give generously of their time and money, supported by a galaxy of celebrities from showbusiness and sport.
    I suspect, however, that this title has been added to the other more formal honours with humourous intent.
     

    . 1

    Banned
    Australian Australia
    Perhaps I should have explained, Parasian, that "The Variety Club" is a charitable organisation run by the entertainment profession and they do a lot of good work, especially for children. I believe branches of the organisation exist in a number of English-speaking countries.
    Apparently not in Malta according to http://members.ozemail.com.au/~bworth/bashvc.htm.
    My guess is that this was chosen on purpose because Malta has links to Knights and Orders of the Garter and much medieval pomp but no Variety Club.
    It's kind of like talking about the Snow Ski Club of Death Valley, something that doesn't exist to add more humour.

    .,,
     
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