dough [money]

< Previous | Next >

heidita

Banned
Germany (German, English, Spanish)
I was surprised to see Harry Potter on Leno's show confusing the following.

Leno: so, do you make a lot of dough?
Harry: Oh?? yes, a lot of bread...??

Leno insisted that no, he had meant money.

Is dough not a familiar term in British English? I was rather surprised.
 
  • liliput

    Senior Member
    U.K. English
    I was surprised to see Harry Potter on Leno's show confusing the following.

    Leno: so, do you make a lot of dough?
    Harry: Oh?? yes, a lot of bread...??

    Leno insisted that no, he had meant money.

    Is dough not a familiar term in British English? I was rather surprised.
    The term is known in BE, but it's not frequently used, maybe it's a little old-fashioned here, or maybe it's mainly an AE expression. To add to the confusion, "bread" can also mean money. Maybe he was joking, or maybe he was jet-lagged.
     

    Silver

    Senior Member
    Chinese,Cantonese,Sichuan dialect
    In WR dictionary, it is labelled "informal" while Cambridge labels it "old-fashioned", my teacher also gave us this expression:

    She has got a lot of dough.

    Here I want to ask again the popularity of the word, thanks a lot.
     

    natkretep

    Moderato con anima (English Only)
    English (Singapore/UK), basic Chinese
    I was surprised to see Harry Potter on Leno's show confusing the following.
    Daniel Radcliffe, yes?

    I think BrE speakers would understand it, and I suspect Radcliffe was teasing Leno. I don't hear dough used this way a lot these days.
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top