download on

Saluton

Banned
Russian
You can download the programme on this page.

You can download the programme at this page.

You can download the programme from this page.


Is only "from" correct?
 
  • owlman5

    Senior Member
    English-US
    Hello, Saluton. This is a good question. I would certainly understand and accept all three versions although I prefer "from this page". I'm interested in reading what others think about this topic.
     

    Silver

    Senior Member
    Chinese,Cantonese,Sichuan dialect
    Hi. Please help me with this question. The sentence is from FT.com

    But it is not all gloom. Authorities in several cities have given away tens of millions of renminbi as new year “red packets” that can be downloaded on to a smartphone. (Source: The Great Jobs Reset.)

    Why is the "on" necessary here? Is it okay without the "on" here?

    Much appreciated!
     

    manfy

    Senior Member
    German - Austria
    Why is the "on" necessary here? Is it okay without the "on" here?
    I think it's fine to use only 'to', ie. "you can download it to your smartphone". 'To' specifies the target of the action 'download'.

    But personally I prefer "you can download it onto your smartphone" because after the download you have the file on your smartphone, so the preposition 'onto' makes sense.

    I'd never write "download on to"; it sounds/feels wrong.

    But let's move on to another subject. :rolleyes: (Here you can see that 'on to' and 'onto' have different meanings. Here 'on' is part of the verbal phrase 'to move on' and not part of the preposition 'onto'.)
     

    Edinburgher

    Senior Member
    German/English bilingual
    I agree that "on to" is an error, a mis-spelling of "onto".
    I also agree that "to" instead of "onto" is possible. I don't have much of a preference either way.

    It's funny that we should think of things being "on" our phones or "on" our computers, as if they were surfaces or, dare I say it, platforms. In a way, these devices are containers, little boxes, and it also makes sense to think of content being "in" them. So I wouldn't have a problem with downloading something into our phones or computers.

    One advantage of "to" is that we don't need to worry about choosing between "into" and "onto". :)
     

    manfy

    Senior Member
    German - Austria
    I agree that "on to" is an error, a mis-spelling of "onto".
    :thumbsup: That's what I thought, too. But it seems that things have changed.
    I have a feeling I see 'on to' with the meaning of 'onto' much more often on the internet than 20-30 years ago.

    Now I found an interesting statement from Lexico, which is based on OED (highlighting by me):
    Nevertheless, some people still don’t accept it as part of standard British English (unlike into) and it’s best to use the two-word form in formal writing.
     

    PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    You can download the programme at this page.
    I would only use this if it were followed by a link to another page.
    Nevertheless, some people still don’t accept it as part of standard British English (unlike into) and it’s best to use the two-word form in formal writing.
    Despite Julian Stuart's dictum "When enough people are wrong, they are right" I'll be sticking to the two forms: onto to express motion or change; on to to express a place.
     
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