downs [in soccer?]

leivev

Senior Member
美之大成, 汉语
Hi, folks:

Could anyone help with << downs >> under the context?

<< Second question has own thread.>>

Thanks beforehand
http://specials.blogs.time.com/2010/06/11/the-world-cup-in-3d-right-technology-wrong-sport/

And in a game where scoring is so rare, you absolutely can't miss a goal. Further, since there are so few natural breaks in the action - no stoppage of play between downs, pitches, or foul shots - a director can't call for too many crowd shots.
So should ESPN have started its 3D venture with soccer? The network certainly took a risk. Given the scope, and cache of the event, a World Cup debut is awfully difficult to turn down. But first impressions are important too. Luckily, it's still early in the draw. There's still plenty of time to start ducking.(head water, difficult)
 
Last edited:
  • mgcrules

    Senior Member
    English - Australia
    I would say that 'down' does have some soccer meaning behind it, as it's listed next to 'pitches' and 'foul shots'. Sorry, but I don't know what it means in this context.
     

    Cagey

    post mod (English Only / Latin)
    English - US
    Perhaps the 'downs' are in American football, when the play stops. The writer is saying an advantage of soccer is that it doesn't have them.

    I would suppose that "pitches" and "foul shots" are from other sports as well, (baseball and basketball?) and are also occasions on which the play stops, making for less engaging television.
     

    Hermione Golightly

    Senior Member
    British English
    It might be something to do with injuries stopping play temporarily. There's a colloquial expression, 'to come down with' an injury or illness.

    The boss has come down with the flu.

    Henry won't be playing today - he's down with a twisted ankle.

    I feel so rotten, I think I'm coming down with something.

    This is 'down' metaphorically, meaning out of action. Of course in soccer the injured player is likely to be physically 'down' on the ground too, at some point.

    I might be completely wrong. :)

    Hermione
     

    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    I agree with Cagey (post 4): "downs", "pitches" and "foul shots" are references to events causing stoppages in sports other than soccer.
     

    JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    The down is the one familiar to viewers of American Football.

    Further, since there are so few natural breaks in the action - no stoppage of play between downs (as there are in American Football), pitches, or foul shots (as there are in Baseball) - a director (of the TV coverage of soccer) can't call for too many crowd shots.
    These are examples from other sports where there are natural breaks in the action in which the show's director can show crowd reactions (or even commercials/ads).
     

    Copyright

    Senior Member
    American English
    Cagey and Loob have it with the stoppages in American football, baseball, and basketball. Thank you... that's one of the reasons I hang around here: to prise my head out of the box it occasionally curls up and goes to sleep in. :)
     

    Thomas Tompion

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Cagey and Loob have it with the stoppages in American football, baseball, and basketball. Thank you... that's one of the reasons I hang around here: to prise my head out of the box it occasionally curls up and goes to sleep in. :)
    I wonder.

    In American and Canadian football, a down refers to a period in which a play transpires. (Source)

    Here's someone prepared to go online and claim with apparent authority that a down is a period of play, NOT a stoppage.

    Notice -A down begins with a snap or free kick (such as a kickoff or safety kick)...

    It's a strange stoppage which starts with a kickoff.

    The OP say no stoppage of play between downs, and this seems consistent with the view that a down is a passage of play.
     

    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    TT, I don't think anyone was saying that a down - or a pitch or a foul shot - was a stoppage, only that it was followed by one....

    That said, I'm well out of my depth here:D.
     

    Hermione Golightly

    Senior Member
    British English
    I'm well out of my depth here
    I drowned before I even got in the water.:D

    We didn't get a source, did we, Leivev.:( That might have helped. Reading it very very carefully, and with hindsight, it does sound like an American source.
    Now I am off to investigate the word cache which I hadn't noticed before.

    Given the scope, and cache of the event, a World Cup debut is awfully difficult to turn down.
    Cheers!

    Hermione
     

    leivev

    Senior Member
    美之大成, 汉语
    I drowned before I even got in the water.:D

    We didn't get a source, did we, Leivev.:( That might have helped. Reading it very very carefully, and with hindsight, it does sound like an American source.
    Now I am off to investigate the word cache which I hadn't noticed before.



    Cheers!

    Hermione

    Actually ,there is a source, there originally two questions about the same article, another one is about the cache, this passage is excerpted from TIME( a bundle of hiccups...).

    sorry for lurking.


    http://specials.blogs.time.com/2010/06/11/the-world-cup-in-3d-right-technology-wrong-sport/
     

    leivev

    Senior Member
    美之大成, 汉语
    Ah, I see ! Apologies for the misunderstanding about the source. I will look for the cache thread.
    :)
    Hermione
    You don't need apologize, I need to say thank you, never saw so many people gathering together in my thread before, and what you said offer another avenue to tease over it .
     

    Thomas Tompion

    Senior Member
    English - England
    TT, I don't think anyone was saying that a down - or a pitch or a foul shot - was a stoppage, only that it was followed by one....

    That said, I'm well out of my depth here:D.
    You know, I think it was when you said that "downs", "pitches" and "foul shots" are references to events causing stoppages, that you gave me this impression.
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top