doze off vs nod off

chantoto

Member
chinese
What is the difference between "DOZE OFF" and "NOD OFF"?
For example: Teen students sometimes nod off in class.
My teacher said that I could not use "Doze off", but I don't know why?
 
  • Barque

    Senior Member
    Tamil
    In your sentence, "doze off" would work too. (I'd say "teenage students" however.)

    Did you ask your teacher why he/she didn't like "doze off"?
     

    Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    I associate "nod off" as a sleep that you have been fighting off. You are reading a book, or watching a TV show and while trying to concentrate you fall asleep while in the seated position. I see "nodding off" a result of sleep deprivation.

    Here is an example (obviously staged, and a model):



    Here is the former Obama administration's adviser, Larry Summers (not a model and not staged, and fully asleep. Click for a larger image.):

     

    Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    Summers's doing a good job of looking like he's deep in thought.:)
    Until you click the image and see it in detail. But this is exactly what I envision when I think "nodding off"; it parallels "asleep at the wheel".

    This obviously staged shot is part of a promotion for a device that monitors your actions and decides that you are asleep while driving. I would be comfortable referring to this as "nodding off" or "asleep at the wheel".

     

    JulianStuart

    Senior Member
    English (UK then US)
    Until you click the image and see it in detail. But this is exactly what I envision when I think "nodding off"; it parallels "asleep at the wheel".

    This obviously staged shot is part of a promotion for a device that monitors your actions and decides that you are asleep while driving. I would be comfortable referring to this as "nodding off" or "asleep at the wheel".
    In your examples (both threads) I would be equally happy using "dozed off" as "nodded off". They are both unintentional "falling asleep" and (to the OP) do not carry information on how long that sleep will be. I think the terms might be different in origin - I've seen people nod their head back and forth as they doze off:)
     

    Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    In your examples (both threads) I would be equally happy using "dozed off" as "nodded off". They are both unintentional "falling asleep" and (to the OP) do not carry information on how long that sleep will be. I think the terms might be different in origin - I've seen people nod their head back and forth as they doze off:)

    I think "nod off" and "doze off" both imply sleep due to sleep deprivation rather than a normal planned evening sleep. I think both imply a desire (at least minimally) to remain awake.
     
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