Drag

Oros

Senior Member
Korean
What is RSS?
In a world heaving under the weight of billions of web pages, keeping up to date with the information you want can be a drag.

Wouldn't it be better to have the latest news and features delivered directly to you, rather than clicking from site to site? Well now you can, thanks to a very clever service, RSS.

There is some discussion as to what RSS stands for, but the majority plump for 'Really Simple Syndication'. Put plainly, it allows you to identify the content you like and have it delivered directly to you.

It takes the hassle out of staying up-to-date, by showing you the very latest information that you are interested in.

Not all websites currently provide RSS, but it is growing rapidly in popularity and many others, including the Guardian, New York Times and CNN do provide it.


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Look at the first sentence of the above.


What is the meaning of the word 'drag' here? Does it mean a slow process?
 
  • Kelly B

    Senior Member
    USA English
    It means something boring, a tedious chore. It's the 4th meaning in the on site dictionary.
     

    elroy

    Imperfect Mod
    US English/Palestinian Arabic bilingual
    Exactly. It is something that will take a lot of time, effort, and/or energy. It is therefore unpleasant and drags on and on forever.
     

    jacinta

    Senior Member
    USA English
    What a drag! This is a little outdated now :) It's a very 60s expression.
    It's the same as "bummer", a little better but that is also old.
    Now, it would probably be "It sucks", the wonderful phrase that is very used now :( .
     

    elroy

    Imperfect Mod
    US English/Palestinian Arabic bilingual
    jacinta said:
    What a drag! This is a little outdated now :) It's a very 60s expression.
    It's the same as "bummer", a little better but that is also old.
    Now, it would probably be "It sucks", the wonderful phrase that is very used now :( .
    "It sucks" has a much broader spectrum of possibilities for usage. ;)

    Same goes for "bummer."
     

    cuchuflete

    Senior Member
    EEUU-inglés
    I think of "what a drag" or "can be a drag" as equivalent to "what a PITA" or "can be a PITA". That is, as previously noted, something tedious and disagreeable. It's a chore. It's boring, though often necessary.
    Doing my taxes is a drag.
    Planting daylilies on a very hot day....is not a drag...I know that they will reward me with flowers. However, the black flies that attack me are a drag. (see PITA).


    un saludo,
    Cuchu

    PS-PITA= Pain In The A__
     

    foxfirebrand

    Senior Member
    Southern AE greatly modified by a 1st-generation Scottish-American mother, and growing up abroad.
    I think a drag is more of a hassle than a bummer. It does connote a rather minor problem.

    That's why Paul McCartney was slammed when he used the phrase so infamously, on hearing of John Lennon's death. "Yeah, s'a drag, isn't it?"

    Of course the man was stunned, and there's no telling (and certainly no use being judgmental about) what pops out of someone's mouth in a moment of shock and grief. But it did sound pretty cavalier, and many Lennon partisans seethed for years about it.

    Off the top of my head-- the Stones sang "it's a drag getting old," and Zappa sneered to his arenaful of fans, "Plastic people you're such a drag!"

    Those were the days.
     

    johnL

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    foxfirebrand said:
    Off the top of my head-- the Stones sang "it's a drag getting old," and Zappa sneered to his arenaful of fans, "Plastic people you're such a drag!"

    Those were the days.
    Not to be too picky ('cause I know that's a drag) but didn't they actually sing, "What a drag it is getting old?"

    Frankly, I use "drag" and "bummer" both. "Sucks" is usually reserved for certain people, as in the famous bumper sticker "Mean people suck!"
     

    foxfirebrand

    Senior Member
    Southern AE greatly modified by a 1st-generation Scottish-American mother, and growing up abroad.
    Yeah, "what a drag it is getting old" sounds right on. Right on! Another hoary old expression from the sixties.

    By the way, I guarantee you nobody said "that sucks" back then. Not that we didn't have vulgar expressions, "eat it" for example-- but "it sucks" just wasn't in use, I'd say till the (?)eighties or so? Variants like "that really bites" have a second or third-season SNL aura to them, for my ear, which would've been 78-9 or so. Dan Ackroyd hosting "Bad Cinema," saying "that reeeally bites the big one, doesn't it?" As he drops the script into the trashcan.
     
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