drainage opening in a bath tub

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susanna76

Senior Member
Romanian
You know how some bath tubs have a opening in the front, a little under the faucet, so the water could drain if it gets to that level? What is that drainage opening called?

Thank you!
 
  • sdgraham

    Senior Member
    USA English
    In AE, we normally just say "overflow" unless we're talking about the piping, etc. that keeps your bathwater from just going all over the floor.

    See: http://www.wisegeek.com/what-is-an-overflow-drain.htm

    Usage of "overflow" is not limited to bathtubs, but is used for sinks, water tanks and even dams.

    You asked, however what the "opening" is called, which I'm not sure you really mean.

    If you're only talking about a tub in which there is no drain tube, then I guess we'd call it an overflow opening or something - depending upon context.
     

    Wordsmyth

    Senior Member
    Native language: English (BrE)
    [...] You asked, however what the "opening" is called, which I'm not sure you really mean.
    If you're only talking about a tub in which there is no drain tube, then I guess we'd call it an overflow opening or something - depending upon context.
    I can't imagine why you'd have an opening three or four inches below the top of the bath, with no drain tube. That would just cause the bath to overflow several minutes earlier. It would be better not to have such a hole, and save your bathroom floor for a few minutes longer.:p

    I suspect susanna is talking about the normal kind (with a drain tube), which, we appear to agree, is called an overflow.

    Ws:)
     

    PaulQ

    Banned
    UK
    English - England
    SDG is replying accurate to the question which asks for the name of the hole, not it's function - the overflow is the entire thing; from hole to the outlet pipe (and beyond.) The hole is "the overflow hole."
     

    Wordsmyth

    Senior Member
    Native language: English (BrE)
    Indeed, Paul, that's a faultless technical analysis — and it applies to to the kind with drain tubes. I wasn't bringing into question the distinction between hole, tube and entirety, but simply querying sdg's "a tub in which there is no drain tube". In fact, such a thing would just be a hole, so the hole would be the entire thing; and as you say, "the overflow is the entire thing", so in that case the hole would be "the overflow".

    Now, coming back to the normal kind (with an outlet pipe), I agree that if you need to distinguish between the different parts, you might say, for example, "The pipe is blocked just behind the
    overflow hole".

    However, if the conversation is just about the visible parts of the bath, I suggest that the opening can be called just "the overflow" (as Andy and sdg have proposed). "
    I have a problem cleaning the bath around the overflow"; "The water was lapping at the edge of the overflow"; "My toe was stuck in the overflow".

    Ws
    :)


     

    PaulQ

    Banned
    UK
    English - England
    ... but simply querying sdg's "a tub in which there is no drain tube". In fact, such a thing would just be a hole,
    No. Imagine a brand new bath in the showroom or warehouse; the overflow hole would indeed be "a hole" but, were you to refer to it, perhaps you would have to distinguish it from the hole that is the "plug hole" - it therefore becomes "the overflow hole."
    However, if the conversation is just about the visible parts of the bath, I suggest that the opening can be called just "the overflow"
    You have assumed that the bath is complete and in situ and functional. I do not know if that is what the OP intended. She may well be wishing to specify that hole and/or, as above, distinguish it from the plug hole.
     

    Andygc

    Senior Member
    British English
    I do not know if that is what the OP intended. She may well be wishing to specify that hole and/or, as above, distinguish it from the plug hole.
    Chaps. Rather than argue about it, why not ask her, and then wait for an answer?
     

    Wordsmyth

    Senior Member
    Native language: English (BrE)
    .
    I'm all for that, Filsmith.:thumbsup:

    Just one more thought for susanna, though: If you're looking at a brand new bath in a showroom or warehouse (or perhaps an old one being used in a bathtub race), don't overlook Paul's post #9.:D

    Ws
    :)
     

    susanna76

    Senior Member
    Romanian
    I think overflow is what I mean :)
    Thanks, everyone!! :):D
    In fact, I was wondering about "overflow point" too, but it turns out that is some kind of concept in physics. So it's good to know I can use "overflow" on its own. Thanks again!
     
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