Draw/drag from/on a cigarette

sagar grammar

Senior Member
Namaste,
Dear members.

Please tell me if there is a difference between the two versions. What I could see is only the change in prepositions, but is there any other change in meaning, situation etc.

1- She took one last draw from the cigarette.

2- She took a long drag on her cigarette.

Thanks in advance. :)
 
  • Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    "one last" and "a long" are completely different, both as words and in meaning. Are you testing us or asking a question for yourself? ;) "the cigarette" and "her cigarette" are also different and may not be the same cigarette in context.
     

    sagar grammar

    Senior Member
    "one last" and "a long" are completely different, both as words and in meaning. Are you testing us or asking a question for yourself? ;) "the cigarette" and "her cigarette" are also different and may not be the same cigarette in context.
    Sorry for not having expressed myself well.
    :(



    1- She took one last draw from the cigarette.

    2- She took a long drag on her cigarette.
    I meant to ask about the difference between the two phrases.

    #1- "take a draw from the cigarette"
    #2- "take a drag on the cigarette"
     

    DonnyB

    Sixties Mod
    English UK Southern Standard English
    In BE we'd use "on [a cigarette]" with both draw and drag.

    There's no real difference otherwise, apart from the fact that "drag" is colloquial, borderline slang.
     
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