draw me out

Allegromoderato2

Senior Member
Portuguese
If I'm talking to someone and I'm having some difficulty to express my thoughts, could I ask them "please, draw me out"? Or isn't it something to be said?
 
  • The Newt

    Senior Member
    English - US
    If I'm talking to someone and I'm having some difficulty to express my thoughts, could I ask them "please, draw me out"? Or isn't it something to be said?
    I don't think it's natural, but it's not clear what you're asking the other person to do. Sometimes, in a situation like this, we might say "help me out."

    It was one of those -- what do you call it? help me out, here -- oh yeah, deja vu moments.
     

    Allegromoderato2

    Senior Member
    Portuguese
    I don't think it's natural, but it's not clear what you're asking the other person to do. Sometimes, in a situation like this, we might say "help me out."

    It was one of those -- what do you call it? help me out, here -- oh yeah, deja vu moments.
    Thanks!
    I think I took the definition literally:

    draw sb out
    to help someone to express their thoughts and feelings more easily by making thatperson feel less nervous
    draw sb out Meaning in the Cambridge English Dictionary
     

    dojibear

    Senior Member
    English - Northeast US
    The concept makes perfect sense. But you usually don't have to ask.

    According to people who study this stuff, normal face-to-face conversation includes a constant flow of nonverbal comments from the listener to the speaker: nods, face expressions, body language, grunts, "uh-huh", "yes" and so on.

    If you are struggling to explain something, the listener should be helping. When you get stuck, they should jump in with a question. Billions of "good listeners" know how to do this, and do it every day. Having to ask for help is unusual.

    This is why some people (like me) are good at explaining something to 1 person, and bad at explaining something to a large group. I may have to make 15 points. Talking to 1 person, I instantly know when they "understand" each point and I can switch to the next point. Talking to a group, I don't have that feedback. "Public speaking" to a large group is very different from normal conversation. That is why good public speaking requires training.
     

    Allegromoderato2

    Senior Member
    Portuguese
    The concept makes perfect sense. But you usually don't have to ask.

    According to people who study this stuff, normal face-to-face conversation includes a constant flow of nonverbal comments from the listener to the speaker: nods, face expressions, body language, grunts, "uh-huh", "yes" and so on.

    If you are struggling to explain something, the listener should be helping. When you get stuck, they should jump in with a question. Billions of "good listeners" know how to do this, and do it every day. Having to ask for help is unusual.

    This is why some people (like me) are good at explaining something to 1 person, and bad at explaining something to a large group. I may have to make 15 points. Talking to 1 person, I instantly know when they "understand" each point and I can switch to the next point. Talking to a group, I don't have that feedback. "Public speaking" to a large group is very different from normal conversation. That is why good public speaking requires training.
    Thanks!:)
     
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