draw on vs fall back up (on)

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mousesanya

New Member
Hello. I'm studying English phrasal verbs and have some difficulties with "to draw on" and "to fall back up (on)", could you help me please? :)

She always has her teaching experience to fall back up (on).
She always draws on her teaching experience.

More examples:

His novels drew heavily on his childhood.
His novels fell back up (on) his childhood.

What's the difference?
 
  • Glasguensis

    Signal Modulation
    English - Scotland
    The difference is the meaning. In these examples to draw on means to use. To fall back on / upon (not “up”) means to have recourse to a secondary resource.
     

    mousesanya

    New Member
    The difference is the meaning. In these examples to draw on means to use. To fall back on / upon (not “up”) means to have recourse to a secondary resource.
    Thank you! But how it will be If I paraphrase it with "use"?

    His novels drew heavily on his childhood. - He used his childhood (stories, memories) for his novels. - as to a main resource?
    His novels fell back on (upon) his childhood. - He recoursed to his childhood as to a resource. - as to a secondary resource?
     
    Last edited:

    Glasguensis

    Signal Modulation
    English - Scotland
    To say his novels fall back on his childhood makes no sense to me. Please explain in different words what you mean.

    On the other hand authors frequently draw on their childhood. If you are merely trying to choose between the two expressions then this is undoubtedly the correct choice.
     
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