draw on

Gabriel Malheiros

Senior Member
Portuguese - Brazil
Hi, there

I am writting about Piaget, and I would like to know if it is wrong or odd to use "draw on" as I did in the following paragraph:



Piaget draws on the reasoning/line of reasoning through which he first established the proposition of genetic epistemology, based on the knowledge in its most pure form, which was the central object of study/subject of his work. For that purpose, he starts his analysis of the study of knowledge by addressing the classical epistemology.


Is it odd?

Thank you
 
  • Gabriel Malheiros

    Senior Member
    Portuguese - Brazil
    No, not odd. It is the normal use of "draw on".
    Actually, when I thought of this expression for the first time, I found it a little odd when used with the word "reasoning"... But I was confused, so I posted here for your opinion. Doesn't it sound kind of stilted?
     
    Last edited:

    dojibear

    Senior Member
    English - Northeast US
    It occurs to me that "draws on" normally says two things. Just to number things clearly, I'll call them "rules":

    Rule 1. A person BB "draws on" the concepts of some other person AA.

    Rule 2. A person "draws on" (uses) a set of ideas A, in the process of developing a new set of ideas B.

    Example: "In designing his officer training, Julius Ceasar drew on the ideals of the Greek Spartans".

    In post #1 it says that Piaget "draws on" on certain ideas, in the process of developing.....what? It does not say. So it fails Rule 2. And the ideas he "draws on" are his own, failing Rule 1.

    I think this is why it "sounds kind of stilted": not using "draws on" in the normal way.
     

    Gabriel Malheiros

    Senior Member
    Portuguese - Brazil
    It occurs to me that "draws on" normally says two things. Just to number things clearly, I'll call them "rules":

    Rule 1. A person BB "draws on" the concepts of some other person AA.

    Rule 2. A person "draws on" (uses) a set of ideas A, in the process of developing a new set of ideas B.

    Example: "In designing his officer training, Julius Ceasar drew on the ideals of the Greek Spartans".

    In post #1 it says that Piaget "draws on" on certain ideas, in the process of developing.....what? It does not say. So it fails Rule 2. And the ideas he "draws on" are his own, failing Rule 1.

    I think this is why it "sounds kind of stilted": not using "draws on" in the normal way.
    But should I keep it or drop it? You said that it was the normal use of draw on and didn't sound odd , but that it is stilted because it fails these rules. So, is it odd? Should I drop it out of my sentence?

    Thank you, Dojibear!
     
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