Dream , daydream , pipe dream

Hi everybody I'd like to know ''how does it work'' in your language ?

In Polish (and probably in some other languages) we use two completely different verbs "śnić" and "marzyć".


dream = a series of events and images that happen in your mind while you are sleeping.

daydream = a pleasant visionary usually wishful creation of the imagination.

I drifted off in a daydream during the class.

pipe dream = an idea which can only be imagined, and which would be impossible to carry out.

Her plans are not realistic - they'll never be more than a pipe dream.


dream = sen
to dream = śnić (during the night)

daydream = marzyć , snuć marzenia
daydream = śnić na jawie

dreamer = marzyciel
dreamy = rozmarzony
daydreams = marzenia


pipe dream = mrzonka


marzyć
: from Proto -Slavic mariti (dialect) → cause , bring something swarm, appear , show, or from Proto-Slavic mьriti → glimmer, hallucinate, swarm , appear, be barely visible.

od XV w.; prasł. *mariti (dialect.) → powodować, że coś się roi, pojawia, ukazuje < prasł. *mьrěti lub prasł. *mьriti → migotać, majaczyć, pojawiać się, roić się, być ledwo widocznym.

mrzonka → from Polish mżeć (glimmer , arise dimly ,daydream )
 
  • Awwal12

    Senior Member
    Russian
    Typically one word in Germanic languages and two in Slavic; cf. Rus. мечта (mechtá) "daydream" vs. сон (son) "dream". It should be noted that in Slavic languages "sleep" and "dream" are usually denoted by one word or by closely related words.
     
    Greek:

    Dream: «Όνειρο» [ˈo̞niɾo̞] (neut.) < Classical masc. noun «ὄνειρος» óneirŏs, also neut. «ὄνειρον» óneirŏn (less common), earlier neuter noun «ὄναρ» ónăr (found only in nominative/accusative singular), from PIE *h₃en-r- > *h₃ner-io- dream cf Arm. անուրջ [ɑˈnuɾd͡ʒ], Alb. ëndërr [ˈəndər], both mean dream).
    To dream: «Ονειρεύομαι» [o̞niˈɾe̞vo̞me̞] (deponent v.) < Βyz.Gr. deponent v. «ὀνειρεύομαι» oneireúomai (idem) < Classical masc. noun «ὄνειρος» óneirŏs (see above) + Classical verbal suffix «-εύω» -eúō (which becomes «-εύομαι» -eúŏmai in the mediopassive voice).
    In various Modern Greek dialects the verb is the deponent «νείρομαι» [ˈniɾo̞me̞] (which is the aphetism of «ονείρομαι» [o̞ˈniɾo̞me̞] < «ὄνειρος»).

    Daydream: «Ονειροπόληση» [o̞niɾo̞ˈpo̞lis̠i] (fem.) < Classical 3rd declension fem. noun «ὀνειροπόλησις» ŏneirŏpólēsis (nom. sing.), «ὀνειροπολήσεως» ŏneirŏpŏlḗsĕōs (gen. sing.) --> dreaming, daydreaming, a compound: Classical «ὄνειρος» (see earlier) + o-grade of Classsical v. «πέλω» pélō.
    To daydream: «Ονειροπολώ» [o̞niɾo̞po̞ˈlo̞] < Classical «ὄνειρος» + «πέλω».

    Pipe dream: «Χίμαιρα» [ˈçime̞ɾa] (fem.) < Classical fem. noun «χίμαιρᾱ» kʰímairā, the feminine form of masculine noun «χίμαρος» kʰímărŏs; in ancient Greek mythology she was a monstrous fire-breathing hybrid creature composed of the body of a lion, with the head of a goat protruding from her back, and a tail that might end with a snake's head. The word later came to describe anything composed of very disparate parts, or perceived as wildly imaginative, implausible, or dazzling.
    For verb, we just use «ονειροπολώ».

    Apologies for my late editing, I corrected some spelling mistakes
     
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    Ghabi

    Senior Member
    Cantonese
    Cantonese:

    dream: mung6 夢

    daydream: baak6jat6mung6 白日夢 "bright-day-dream"

    pipe dream: ci1jan4syut3mung6 痴人說夢 "a fool sleep-talking" (Cf. Macbeth: "it is a tale / Told by an idiot, full of sound and fury, / Signifying nothing")
     

    Welsh_Sion

    Senior Member
    Welsh - Northern
    Cymraeg/Welsh

    a dream = breuddwyd
    to dream = breuddwydio

    a daydream = synfyfyrdod (a meditation), breuddwyd liw dydd (a daytime dream)
    to daydream = synfyfyrio, pensynnu (surprising the head), gwlana, pencawna, breuddwydio liw dydd, hel meddyliau (to collect thoughts)

    a dreamer = breuddwydiwr, breuddwydwraig
    a day-dreamer = synfyfyriwr, synfyfyrwraig, breuddwydiwr liw dydd, breuddwydwraig liw dydd, pensynnwr, pensynwraig

    a pipe dream = breuddwyd gwrach (a witch's dream), breuddwyd wrth eich ewyllys (a dream by your will)
     
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    Penyafort

    Senior Member
    Catalan (Catalonia), Spanish (Spain)
    Catalan:

    dream = somni ['sɔmni] m. < Latin sŏmnĭu
    to dream = somiar [sumi'a] or somniar [sumni'a] < Latin somnĭāre

    daydream = il·lusió [il:uzi'o] f. < Latin illusiōne, fantasia [fəntə'ziə] f. < Latin phantasia < Greek φαντασία
    to daydream = somiar truites ('to dream omelettes'), somiar despert ('to dream awake'), fantasiar ('to fantasize')

    pipe dream = quimera [ki'meɾə] f. < Latin chimaira < Greek χίμαιρα


    Notes:
    1) The word son (from Latin somnu) only refers to either 1) the state of sleep, in which case it is masculine, or 2) to the wish to sleep (sleepiness), in which case it is feminine. The word is never used for 'dream'.

    2) The word ensonyament, unlike the Spanish ensoñación ('daydream'), also refers to drowsiness in Catalan, not to daydreaming.
     
    ...

    Pipe dream: «Χίμαιρα» [ˈçime̞ɾa] (fem.) < Classical fem. noun «χίμαιρᾱ» kʰímairā, the feminine form of masculine noun «χίμαρος» kʰímărŏs; in ancient Greek mythology she was a monstrous fire-breathing hybrid creature composed of the body of a lion, with the head of a goat protruding from her back, and a tail that might end with a snake's head. The word later came to describe anything composed of very disparate parts, or perceived as wildly imaginative, implausible, or dazzling.
    For verb, we just use «ονειροπολώ».

    Apologies for my late editing, I corrected some spelling mistakes
    Αn alternative of «χίμαιρα» for pipe dream is «όνειρο/-ρα θερινής νυκτός» [ˈo̞niɾo̞ θe̞ɾiˈnis̠ niˈkto̞s̠] (sing.), [ˈo̞niɾa θe̞ɾiˈnis̠ niˈkto̞s̠] (pl.) --> summer night's dream(s). The phrase is commonly used and it's the Greek translation of the Shakespearean play "A midsummer night's dream".
     
    Greek:

    Dream: «Όνειρο» [ˈo̞niɾo̞] (neut.) < Classical masc. noun «ὄνειρος» óneirŏs, also neut. «ὄνειρον» óneirŏn (less common), earlier neuter noun «ὄναρ» ónăr (found only in nominative/accusative singular), from PIE *h₃en-r- > *h₃ner-io- dream cf Arm. անուրջ [ɑˈnuɾd͡ʒ], Alb. ëndërr [ˈəndər], both mean dream).
    To dream: «Ονειρεύομαι» [o̞niˈɾe̞vo̞me̞] (deponent v.) < Βyz.Gr. deponent v. «ὀνειρεύομαι» oneireúomai (idem) < Classical masc. noun «ὄνειρος» óneirŏs (see above) + Classical verbal suffix «-εύω» -eúō (which becomes «-εύομαι» -eúŏmai in the mediopassive voice).
    In various Modern Greek dialects the verb is the deponent «νείρομαι» [ˈniɾo̞me̞] (which is the aphetism of «ονείρομαι» [o̞ˈniɾo̞me̞] < «ὄνειρος»).

    Daydream: «Ονειροπόληση» [o̞niɾo̞ˈpo̞lis̠i] (fem.) < Classical 3rd declension fem. noun «ὀνειροπόλησις» ŏneirŏpólēsis (nom. sing.), «ὀνειροπολήσεως» ŏneirŏpŏlḗsĕōs (gen. sing.) --> dreaming, daydreaming, a compound: Classical «ὄνειρος» (see earlier) + o-grade of Classsical v. «πέλω» pélō.
    To daydream: «Ονειροπολώ» [o̞niɾo̞po̞ˈlo̞] < Classical «ὄνειρος» + «πέλω».

    Pipe dream: «Χίμαιρα» [ˈçime̞ɾa] (fem.) < Classical fem. noun «χίμαιρᾱ» kʰímairā, the feminine form of masculine noun «χίμαρος» kʰímărŏs; in ancient Greek mythology she was a monstrous fire-breathing hybrid creature composed of the body of a lion, with the head of a goat protruding from her back, and a tail that might end with a snake's head. The word later came to describe anything composed of very disparate parts, or perceived as wildly imaginative, implausible, or dazzling.
    For verb, we just use «ονειροπολώ».

    Apologies for my late editing, I corrected some spelling mistakes
    I found this very interesting ;:oops:

    ὄναρ (onar)

    Apparenté à անուրջ, (anurj) de même sens en arménien, de l’indo-européen commun *oner-rêve »).

    To dream: «Ονειρεύομαι» o̞niˈɾe̞vo̞me̞ = rêver ?

    Anyway it seems that rêver comes from Latin;

    (XIIe siècle) De l’ancien français resver (« errer »), de re- et *esver (« errer ») → voir desver (« divaguer »), du gallo-romain *esvo (« vagabond »), du latin populaire *exvagus, composé de ex et de vagus (« errant »). Il avait le sens de « délirer, radoter » et a supplanté songer dans le sens de « faire des rêves en dormant ».

    rêverie = a state of being pleasantly lost in one's thoughts, a daydream.
    Activité mentale dirigée vers des pensées vagues, sans but précis : Être perdu dans de continuelles rêveries.
    Idée folle, chimérique : Les rêveries des utopistes.

    La rêverie se fait éveillé alors que le rêve a lieu pendant le sommeil.

    Χίμαιρα» [ˈçime̞ɾa]

    I 'm not sure about English , but if we take a look at the Italian , French and Polish and many other languages ..;

    chimèra (IT)
    Idea senza fondamento, sogno vano, fantasticheria strana, utopia.

    chimère (FR)
    Projet séduisant, mais irréalisable ; idée vaine qui n'est que le produit de l'imagination ; illusion.

    chimera (PL)
    coś nierealnego, fantastycznego, wymyślonego ,kaprys, wybryk, zachcianka, dziwactwo.

    but in English chimere ;

    a loose sleeveless robe worn by Anglican bishops over the rochet..

    Catalan:

    dream = somni ['sɔmni] m. < Latin sŏmnĭu
    to dream = somiar [sumi'a] or somniar [sumni'a] < Latin somnĭāre

    daydream = il·lusió [il:uzi'o] f. < Latin illusiōne, fantasia [fəntə'ziə] f. < Latin phantasia < Greek φαντασία
    to daydream = somiar truites ('to dream omelettes'), somiar despert ('to dream awake'), fantasiar ('to fantasize')

    pipe dream = quimera [ki'meɾə] f. < Latin chimaira < Greek χίμαιρα


    Notes:
    1) The word son (from Latin somnu) only refers to either 1) the state of sleep, in which case it is masculine, or 2) to the wish to sleep (sleepiness), in which case it is feminine. The word is never used for 'dream'.

    2) The word ensonyament, unlike the Spanish ensoñación ('daydream'), also refers to drowsiness in Catalan, not to daydreaming.

    Italian

    to dream = sognare
    a dream = sogno

    to daydream = sognare a occhi aperti , fantasticare

    daydreaming = fantasticheria , sogno

    trasognare = fantasticare, andare vagando con la mente, come chi sognasse a occhi aperti:
     
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