dress casual

minhduc

Senior Member
vietnamese
Hello,
I am reading the novel Close to home by Robert Dugoni.

Each wore a suit, though without the tie. Seattle might be changing, but Faz and Del were not. No tie was dress casual for them.

I would like to know the meaning of "dress casual" in this case. Would you like to help me? Thank you.
 
  • PaulQ

    Senior Member
    UK
    English - England
    It should be punctuated:
    Seattle might be changing, but Faz and Del were not. No tie was "dress: casual" for them.

    "dress: casual" is usually found as guidance or advice - an abbreviated instruction - on invitations to a social gathering.
    "dress: casual" means "You should dress in clothes that are casual (i.e. not formal).
     

    kentix

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    I think it would also work fine with just quotation marks.

    No tie was "dress casual" for them.

    It's reported speech of a person (real or theoretical) who made the invitation, "Come to our party and dress casual."

    Dress is a verb in that case.
     

    Hermione Golightly

    Senior Member
    British English
    "Dress:Casual" is what I have seen on invitations. I have never once seen the adverbial form - suffix-ly used.
    It is a formula, not an order.
    (I might have seen 'Casual dress'/'Formal dress', but they are too vague to be useful.)
     
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