dress up / get dressed

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Voy a vestirte para que te vayas bien elegante a la guardería.

a) I´m gonna dress you up so you look nice and pretty for going to nursery school?

b) I´m gonna get you dressed so you may go to nursery school nice and pretty?

By the way, the second part of the phrase also throws me off. (me confunde)

Regards.
 
  • colombo-aussie

    Senior Member
    Spanish - Colombian
    Hola,

    Para mis oidos, tu primera opción suena más a disfrazarse que vestirse. Yo diría algo como:

    I´m gonna get you dressed so you'll look good/stylish at the nursery school?
     
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    Chris K

    Senior Member
    English / US
    Yo diría "I'm going to dress you up so you'll look nice and pretty for nursery school."

    "To dress up" tiene dos sentidos (al menos): 1) disfrazarse, como indica Colomobo-aussie, normalmente antes de "as"; y 2) vestirse en ropa más elegante o más formal.

    I'm going to dress up as a pirate for the party.
    Do I have to dress up or can I go in these clothes?
     

    onbalance

    Senior Member
    English - United States
    Yo diría "I'm going to dress you up so you'll look nice and pretty for nursery school."

    "To dress up" tiene dos sentidos (al menos): 1) disfrazarse, como indica Colomobo-aussie, normalmente antes de "as"; y 2) vestirse en ropa más elegante o más formal.

    I'm going to dress up as a pirate for the party.
    Do I have to dress up or can I go in these clothes?
    Yo diría algo muy parecido: I'm going to dress you up so that you'll look really nice/pretty for daycare. También, si se quiere conservar el verbo "irse," se podría decir: I'm going to dress you up so that you'll go to daycare looking really nice/pretty.
     
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    EddieZumac

    Senior Member
    English/Spanish
    Yo diría algo muy parecido: I'm going to dress you up so that you'll look really nice/pretty for daycare. También, si se quiere conservar el verbo "irse," se podría decir: I'm going to dress up so that you'll go to daycare looking really nice/pretty.
    In the second sentence, add "I'm going to dress you up ...."
     
    I like onbalance's ending to the sentence but I don't care for dress up.

    Dressed up is used when you're smart or when you are going to fancy dress "parties". Dressing up a little girl suggests treating her like a doll, a plaything which is why I would just use dress.

    Daycare is interesting too. I was going to use playschool myself but I decided to stick with the more literal nursery. Nursery sounds very Victorian somehow in this phrase.
     
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