dressed leaves

al_spy

Senior Member
french- France
Hello there,

I had a quick question because in menus you often see "dressed leaves" as a side dish and I wondered whether you can translate it by "salade assaisonnée"? Does it seem right to you? I don't think you would say "feuilles" in French because that's the word you use when you feed animals (rabbits etc. ).
 
  • archijacq

    Senior Member
    french France
    Cela ne m'évoque pas une salade servie à part (side dish), mais une "petite salade" servie sur la même assiette que le steak, l'omelette, etc... et posée sur le côté.
     

    petit1

    Senior Member
    français - France
    Ce serait donc "salade avec son assaisonnement"? (salade assaisonnée) Il ne me viendrait pas à l'idée de servir une salade sans assaisonnement.
     

    petit1

    Senior Member
    français - France
    Tout se dresse avec un peu d'adresse.
    définition de "dresser" en cuisine;
    disposer dans un plat les aliments prêts à être consommés.
     

    Pauline Meryle

    Senior Member
    English UK
    Perhaps "une salade verte". And it would come either dressed or with dressing, as Itisi says.

    Jetset,
    a "salade composée" is one that consists of more than just leaves – probably other salad veg but possibly also cheese, ham etc.
     

    ain'ttranslationfun?

    Senior Member
    US English
    In fact, 'une salade' is by definition dressed, so you don't have to say 'assaisonnée'!
    I pretty much agree, but we do say "salad dressing" in English. I don't think I've ever seen "feuilles dressées" on a menu, though. Isn't a "salade composée" a "mixed salad"? And "feuilles de chêne" is a variety of lettuce, in this context, too. P;S. In F
     

    ain'ttranslationfun?

    Senior Member
    US English
    I was about to write, "In France, there's no such thing as "French dressing"! For what we call "plain Italian" or "oil and vinegar", they just say "vinaigrette", but they might add "...assaisonée" if there's eg mustard in it, too. Bon appetit!

    Oops! I've just re-read this post - sorry about misspelling "assaisonée"!
     
    Last edited:

    Language Hound

    Senior Member
    American English
    Cela ne m'évoque pas une salade servie à part (side dish), mais une "petite salade" servie sur la même assiette que le steak, l'omelette, etc... et posée sur le côté.
    I agree, and I would translate "dressed leaves" as une petite salade verte.

    définition de "dresser" en cuisine;
    disposer dans un plat les aliments prêts à être consommés.
    Yes, that is one meaning (apprêter), but in the OP's context, the meaning is to garnish with a dressing (assaisonner).

    In fact, 'une salade' is by definition dressed, so you don't have to say 'assaisonnée'!
    In France, yes. And I agree that in French it is not necessary to say "assaisonnée." However, in the U.S., when one orders a salad, the waiter usually launches into a very long list of salad dressings one may choose from (French, Italian, Blue Cheese, Ranch, Balsamic Vinaigrette...ad nauseum). Salads do not automatically come with the typical vinaigrette dressing common in France. If I were to read "dressed leaves" on an American menu, I would understand that some special salad greens with their own specific (house) dressing would be placed on the plate next to the main course.
     
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