Drift a cloud back behind county roads

emre aydın

Senior Member
Turkish
Drift a cloud back behind county roads that you run up
The mud on her jeans that she peeled off and hung up
Her blue-eyed summertime smile
looks so good that it hurts

a song from the TV series, Nashville.

1) Is "drift a cloud" inversion of "A cloud drifts"? I mean he actually means "a cloud drifts", right?

2) Are "back" and "behind" together preposition for "county roads"? Why does he use them together in the sentence, for giving emphasis?

Thanks for your help
 
  • Barque

    Senior Member
    Tamil
    As you drive on a (country, or any other actually) road, you drift (move) past from under a cloud, and eventually it's at your back, and you leave it behind, and you keep doing this on roads that you drive on and past (roads that you run up).

    (Song lyrics don't deserve too much analysis; as long as you understand the overall meaning, that's fine.)

    Song lyrics don't need too much examinin'
    They come and go, you sing 'em as you're walkin'
    They float, and drift, and bob, in the air you're breathin'
    They stick around, and your grandchildren sing 'em' as they're playin'
    And they drift clouds of memories back,
    Back behind you on the roooooaaaaaaad!


    Get it?:D
     

    bennymix

    Senior Member
    My guess is that the first line could be restated as "Make a cloud of dust behind* you, (driving on) country roads...."

    *and in back of you (in your car)

    Thus the inversion may be because it's imperative.

    I don't agree with Barques "past from under" interpretation.
     

    kifbender

    Senior Member
    English, USA
    I don't agree with Barques "past from under" interpretation.
    I second that. I would agree that it is referring to the cloud of dust or dirt behind the car. And "drift a cloud back" seems to be the specific phrase that the artist is using here.

    By the way, I'm assuming you are not the famous Turkish singer Emre Aydın? :D
     

    emre aydın

    Senior Member
    Turkish
    Thank you all.

    My guess is that the first line could be restated as "Make a cloud of dust behind* you, (driving on) country roads...."
    So you say, "run" means "drive". Then what is "up" referring to in "run up"? Moving "up(towards a higher point)" or "forward"?

    Using "back" and "behind" together is also still confusing me. Do they both have the same meaning to emphasize?
     
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