drink [it]

  • raymondaliasapollyon

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    But why is "The restaurant provided free mineral water, so she filled the glass and drank" OK?

    And why is "The water was too hot, so I drank 10 minutes later" not idiomatic? What's the crucial difference?:confused:
     

    lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Well, neither of them is particularly idiomatic, since they are what they are — unnaturally fabricated statements that don’t reflect natural speech, or indeed typical conversational comments.

    But in the first, the two parts of the sentence at least bear a logical relationship, and one would naturally assume that what she filled her glass with was the water already mentioned.

    And in the other there’s not even an obvious link between the two statements. We don’t know whether the water was heated to make coffee or tea, or just to drink as warm water. And we can only assume it’s the water that the speaker drank anyway, since drink is used uncountably, with no object.
     

    dojibear

    Senior Member
    US English
    In the following sentence, is the object it necessary?

    The milk was so hot that I couldn't drink [it].

    I'd appreciate your help.
    Without "it", saying "I couldn't drink" means "I couldn't drink any liquid" (tea, water, cola, etc). That is not what you want to express. Why would some milk being hot cause you to be unable to drink tea?
     

    dojibear

    Senior Member
    US English
    The water was too hot, so I drank 10 minutes later. :cross:
    Like before, this "drank" could mean drinking anything, not only the hot water. This sentence does not express "I drank the water after it was cooler". Instead, express this idea this way:

    The water was too hot, so I waited 10 minutes before drinking it. :tick:

    Note: People in China drink hot water as a beverage. US/UK people do not. We drink hot tea or coffee or herbal tea or hot chocolate (hot water with flavorings in it). When we drink plain water, it is either chilled or "at room temperature" (not heated or chilled).
     
    But why is "The restaurant provided free mineral water, so she filled the glass and drank" OK?

    And why is "The water was too hot, so I drank 10 minutes later" not idiomatic? What's the crucial difference?:confused:

    Well, neither of them is particularly idiomatic, since they are what they are — unnaturally fabricated statements that don’t reflect natural speech, or indeed typical conversational comments.
    Most native speakers would say The milk was too hot to drink, so I let it cool down.
     

    dojibear

    Senior Member
    US English
    The restaurant provided free mineral water, so she filled the glass and drank.
    What did she fill the glass with? What did she drink?

    Because they are all in the same sentence, most readers will assume that she used "free mineral water provided by the restaurant" to fill the glass and then to drink. If you are not sure that readers will assume that, add "with it" after "the glass".
     

    raymondaliasapollyon

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    What did she fill the glass with? What did she drink?

    Because they are all in the same sentence, most readers will assume that she used "free mineral water provided by the restaurant" to fill the glass and then to drink. If you are not sure that readers will assume that, add "with it" after "the glass".

    Thank you. Is the following OK then?

    The restaurant provided free mineral water, so she filled the glass with it and drank.

    It is still a question why it's OK to make that assumption in the mineral water example and the resulting sentence is OK, whereas assuming similarly that it was the milk that the speaker couldn't drink does not render the milk example acceptable.

    This seems to be a grammatical issue, unexplainable by reference to context.
     
    Last edited:

    lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    The restaurant provided free mineral water, …
    so she filled the glass with it and drank. (correct, but quite stilted/unnatural)​
    so she filled her glass [and drank some]. :thumbsup: (a bit more natural!)​
     
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