drink tea from a 'saucer'

< Previous | Next >

mimi2

Senior Member
vietnam vietnamese
Hi,
“He poured the tea from his cup into his saucer and then drank it.”
Could you please tell me why the man had to do so to drink. Why didn’t he drink with his cup.
Thanks.
 
  • Thomas Tompion

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Hi,
    “He poured the tea from his cup into his saucer and then drank it.”
    Could you please tell me why the man had to do so to drink. Why didn’t he drink with his cup.
    Thanks.
    Well, Mimi. I suppose this has to do with habits and manners. Some people must just prefer to lap like a dog than to drink an elegant cup of tea. Unless the saucer was high-sided I'm surprised the tea fitted into the saucer.

    Miss Tompion always drinks from the cup.
     

    panjandrum

    Lapsed Moderator
    English-Ireland (top end)
    Either correctly or not, the concept of pouring some tea from the cup into the saucer and drinking from the saucer is buried in my brain as a common practice of the working man in days gone by.

    This may be a memory of a caricature - making the point that the working man in question would never have seen, never mind used, a saucer. Pouring from cup to saucer before drinking was his attempt to make proper use of the utensils provided by the lady of the house.
     

    Lexiphile

    Senior Member
    England English
    I knew people in England in the 1960's, very much older than myself, who had this habit. The idea was to cool the tea in the saucer.
     

    Loob

    Senior Member
    English UK
    Mimi, working men who were in a hurry often used to cool their tea by pouring it into the saucer. They all use mugs these days!

    Loob
     

    L'Homme Inconnu

    Senior Member
    English English
    Wow, it certainly is possible to glean a lot of information from these forums - now I know how to cool down my brew when I have to dash off to a lecture in the morning!!
     

    Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    I was told that you pour your coffee (or tea) from your cup into the saucer to allow it to cool more quickly (and drink it sooner or quicker). I tried it as a child and the liquid spilled onto my cheeks and shirt. Most unsatisfactory in my opinion. (I have not tried this as an adult when it would be assumed that I would have greater saucer-control and have less spillage.)
     

    Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English

    JamesM

    Senior Member
    I've always wondered why it was saucer and not slosher, which seems to fit its function better. :)

    Just to confirm ewie's assumption, saucers are also called saucers in the U.S.
     

    exgerman

    Senior Member
    NYC
    English but my first language was German
    There's a well-known quote from early US history. George Washington (speaking about the two-chamber legislature) is said to have told Jefferson that the framers had created the Senate to "cool" House legislation just as a saucer was used to cool hot tea.
     
    < Previous | Next >
    Top