drink <up>... pay <up>

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Ritwika

Member
Bengali
I oftentimes hear people adding 'up' to a verb, like
Drink up your tea.
Pay up for the hotel rooms etc.
Could someone tell me why?
And why can we just not say, "Pay for the hotel room" or "pay the fine" and not add an 'up' to a verb!
Thanks in advance
 
  • Barque

    Banned
    Tamil
    Drink up your tea.
    This is usually used to mean "Finish your tea", especially when you want the other person to do it quickly. The "up" conveys the idea of finishing it.

    Pay up for the hotel rooms etc.
    This would be used in a specific context. It sounds as if the person being addressed had refused to pay pr had been delaying payment. "Pay up" means something like "Pay and get it over with".
    And why can we just not say, "Pay for the hotel room" or "pay the fine" and not add an 'up' to a verb!
    You can, and they're more common.
     

    lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    The addition of up to a verb does often imply completion — wind up, end up, finish up, lock up, sum up, etc.

    But it can also just intensify the meaning of that verb — live it up, play up, mess up, speak up, pair up, etc.
     

    Uncle Jack

    Senior Member
    British English
    "Drink up your tea" urges the person to drink (and finish) it.
    "Pay up" urges the person to pay. It might be something of a threat, and sounds odd in your original sentence (with "the" rather than "your"; threats tend to be personal).

    "Up" is usually optional, and usually changes the meaning.
     

    Proudy

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    In my experience, both of these sentences would end with up, or it would not be included.
    So...
    "Drink up." not "Drink up your tea."
    "Pay up." not "Pay up the hotel rooms." (and never would I use " ..pay up for the ..")
    Where I grew up the phrase is used to give direction or to order a person to act now. It borders on impolite and depending on the social situation could be considered rude behavior.
     

    Ritwika

    Member
    Bengali
    In my experience, both of these sentences would end with up, or it would not be included.
    So...
    "Drink up." not "Drink up your tea."
    "Pay up." not "Pay up the hotel rooms." (and never would I use " ..pay up for the ..")
    Where I grew up the phrase is used to give direction or to order a person to act now. It borders on impolite and depending on the social situation could be considered rude behavior.
    Could you please tell me as to why can one not say "pay for something" if one has to make a payment in exchange for any good or service.
    Thank you in advance
     

    Barque

    Banned
    Tamil
    Could you please tell me as to why can one not say "pay for something" if one has to make a payment in exchange for any good or service.
    I think you've misunderstood what Proudy said. Proudy said that normally you'd stop at "up", as in "Drink up", and not "Drink up your tea". I don't have the same opinion however.
     

    lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Could you please tell me as to why can one not say "pay for something" if one has to make a payment in exchange for any good or service.
    As far as I can see, the only person who has said that is you. And, as Barque indicated in #2, it’s simply not true. Of course you can say that.
     

    lingobingo

    Senior Member
    English - England
    The verb pay can take a direct object: I’ve already paid the bill. Or it can be used intransitively with a preposition: I’ve already paid for the meal.

    To pay up is a phrasal verb, usually used intransitively to mean “settle a debt”.

    To pay off is another phrasal verb, used transitively to mean “settle a debt in instalments”, or intransitively/figuratively to mean “prove a success”.
     
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