drive customers to choose…

Hase3

New Member
Japanese
Hello! I saw this question in a test, but I cannot make a final decision
between (A) cause and (C) urge. Please someone help me.

A bad review in the magazine will make the customers apprehensive
and will drive them to choose a different restaurant.


Question: The word "drive" in line 2 is closest in meaning to

(A) cause (B) allow (C) urge (D) defy
 
  • Hase3

    New Member
    Japanese
    I understand your distinction between deliberate and undeliberate
    like the distinction below.
    "Urge" tries to change a person's thinking.

    drive somebody to do something = make somebody do something
    cause somebody to do something = make somebody do something
    urge somebody to do something = advise or try to persuade somebody to do something
     

    Hase3

    New Member
    Japanese
    Thank you for your answers: grassy, bennymix, Aguas Claras.

    Although I am not a native speaker of English,
    in my view, this "drive" is very close in meaning to "force."

    bearded

    I feel that we use "urge" and "induce" when trying to persuade
    someone to do something.
     

    Andygc

    Senior Member
    British English
    Although I am not a native speaker of English,
    in my view, this "drive" is very close in meaning to "force."
    I am a native speaker of English (as are bennymix and Aquas Claras), and it is not very close in meaning to "force". The diners read the bad review and choose to go elsewhere, nobody is forcing them to eat in a different restaurant.
     

    kentix

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    "Cause" is the best fit of all the options but I don't think it's a great fit as far as catching the nuance of "drive".

    "Impel" is a similar word to "drive" in that context. There is the idea of force behind it but not force applied by a person with a goal of causing a specific behavior. It's more the force of logic. Why would someone purposely go to a restaurant they were told was bad?
     

    Hase3

    New Member
    Japanese
    Thank you for your replies: Andygc, kentix.

    After reading your comments, I am still not exactly sure what "drive" means.
    My best guess is that to "drive" somebody to do something is to give some
    influence on a person's behavior to do something.
     

    Hase3

    New Member
    Japanese
    se16deddy

    I actually looked up some dictionaries, and I figured out that
    "force" was the best definition of "drive."

    Cambridge Dictionary:
    drive (verb): to force someone or something to go somewhere or do something:

    Oxford Learner's Dictionary:
    drive (verb): to force somebody to act in a particular way
     
    se16deddy

    I actually looked up some dictionaries, and I figured out that
    "force" was the best definition of "drive."

    Cambridge Dictionary:
    drive (verb): to force someone or something to go somewhere or do something:

    Oxford Learner's Dictionary:
    drive (verb): to force somebody to act in a particular way

    'Force' in not good in the original sentence. 'Impel' might work.
     

    Hase3

    New Member
    Japanese
    I found a good example which shows clearly that
    "cause" and "drive" are close in meaning.

    Notifying patients that their personal information has been exposed
    can cause them to lose trust in your organization and drive them to
    choose a different healthcare provider.
     
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