drive/drill/smack a shot

bearfreak

Senior Member
Javanese
I'm a bit perplexed when verbs that describe the action of kicking followed by the object "shot" as in "drive a shot, drill a shot", etc. For example.

Rooney drills a shot wide.
Herrera smacks a shot off the netting side.
William drives a powerful shot towards goal that cannons off the post

if they were interpreted, it would be "kick the ball hard with a shot". This is strange. But I feel that "shot" probably means a ball in this case, right? If so, what do you think, natives?
 
  • sdgraham

    Senior Member
    USA English
    You haven't told us what sport or activity is involved. (There's that context issue again.)

    Might you be talking about Tiddlywinks? :rolleyes:
     

    bearfreak

    Senior Member
    Javanese
    I'm talking about football (soccer) here. I'm a bit confused by verbs like "drill", "drive", "smack", etc, if they are combined with "shot". For example "drill a shot", "drive a shot", "hammer a shot", etc. "Drill" and "drive" both mean to kick the ball very hard, I think, while "shot" is a noun meaning "kick/hit". So, if "drill or drive a shot" is interpreted, it would be to kick the ball very hard with a shot". This sounds strange to me, except that "shot" means the ball there. It makes sense. Am I right?
     

    Packard

    Senior Member
    USA, English
    Radio and TV announcers like colorful words and they often use several to describe the same thing. I don't watch soccer, but I hear this on baseball broadcasts and American football broadcasts. I am not sure at all that they mean anything different from each other.
     
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