Droga Krzyżowa

Sara Lee

Senior Member
Chinese
Hi, all~
Droga Krzyżowa

Q1. Is this Polish expression grammatically correct? If not, please help to correct it.

Q2. What does this Polish expression mean? Does it mean “The Way of the Cross“?
If not correct, please help to explain it in English.
 
Last edited:
  • jasio

    Senior Member
    Is "Droga Krzyżowa" a special term which particularly refers to a series of images depicting Jesus Christ on the day of his crucifixion and accompanying prayers?
    Do you want to understand the term, or to find a proper name for the said series of images?

    The term itself (a translation of the latin term "Via Crucis") means exactly the same as in English: it may refer to the Stations of the Cross (a series of physical images or places), the service, the prayers, etc., but I seem to recall it being used also figuratively.

    A visible representation can be a series of images, but also reliefs, sculptures, etc, or even the sole numbers with crosses which can sometimes be found hanging on the church walls. The stations can be placed in a church, its surroundings or under the open air - see http://www.ciekawemazury.pl/image/6652/Gietrzwald__Sanktuarium_M.jpg - that's why they are typically referred to as "stations" not "images", to describe their function rather than their look. Please remember that albeit the most visible, from the religious point of view the images are only to help organise the service and to help people remember where they actually are, while the most important part are the prayers and the meditation. There are even 'Extreme Ways of the Cross" (https://www.edk.org.pl/en/about-edk.html) with the stations scattered over a route of ~40 km, which are expected to be walked through silently in the night - and this form seems to become increasingly popular in recent years - https://www.edk.org.pl/routes.html.


    Edit: the length of EWC may vary from 20 km to whatever seems to be necessary to make the challenge. The longest I've found is 144 km.
     
    Last edited:

    Michelle Green

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    Do you want to understand the term, or to find a proper name for the said series of images?

    The term itself (a translation of the latin term "Via Crucis") means exactly the same as in English: it may refer to the Stations of the Cross (a series of physical images or places), the service, the prayers, etc., but I seem to recall it being used also figuratively.

    A visible representation can be a series of images, but also reliefs, sculptures, etc, or even the sole numbers with crosses which can sometimes be found hanging on the church walls. The stations can be placed in a church, its surroundings or under the open air - see http://www.ciekawemazury.pl/image/6652/Gietrzwald__Sanktuarium_M.jpg - that's why they are typically referred to as "stations" not "images", to describe their function rather than their look. Please remember that albeit the most visible, from the religious point of view the images are only to help organise the service and to help people remember where they actually are, while the most important part are the prayers and the meditation. There are even 'Extreme Ways of the Cross" (https://www.edk.org.pl/en/about-edk.html) with the stations scattered over a route of ~40 km, which are expected to be walked through silently in the night - and this form seems to become increasingly popular in recent years - https://www.edk.org.pl/routes.html.


    Edit: the length of EWC may vary from 20 km to whatever seems to be necessary to make the challenge. The longest I've found is 144 km.
    I wanted to understand the term itself, and thank you for your detailed explanation. I'm clear now.
     
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