drop a few drops of melted wax

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hectacon

Senior Member
Hindi
To fix the problem, light the candle and drip a pool of wax into the bottom of the hole in the candlestick. Press the problem candle's bottom into the wet wax, holding it upright until the wax hardens enough to keep the candle in place. Pouring liquid wax from a lit jar candle will also work.

This is a blog written by some native speaker I believe.

I want to make some changes here. Can I write like this,

Light the candle and drop a few drops of melted wax into the bottom of the hole in the candlestick. Press the problem candle's bottom into the wet wax, holding it upright until the wax hardens enough to stay firm upright. Pouring liquid wax from a lit jar candle will also work.

<-----Edited by moderator (Florentia52) to remove additional question and confusing italics.----->
 
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  • hectacon

    Senior Member
    Hindi
    Using "drop" wouldn't be incorrect, but "drip" is a better description of what you're being instructed to do.
    But can I say, "drop a few drops of melted wax".

    And again, do we use" drip" to suggest an intentional drop by us. I mean do we drip something intentionally? The tap is dripping, sweat dripping, tears dripping,.

    But we do we do it intentionally?
     

    Florentia52

    Modwoman in the attic
    English - United States
    But can I say, "drop a few drops of melted wax".

    And again, do we use" drip" to suggest an intentional drop by us. I mean do we drip something intentionally? The tap is dripping, sweat dripping, tears dripping,.

    But we do we do it intentionally?
    As I said, it wouldn't be incorrect.

    I don;t think "drop" conveys a stronger sense of something being intentional than "drip" does. Most of the time when I drop something, I do so by accident. And we can certainly drip something deliberately.
     

    hectacon

    Senior Member
    Hindi
    As I said, it wouldn't be incorrect.

    I don;t think "drop" conveys a stronger sense of something being intentional than "drip" does. Most of the time when I drop something, I do so by accident.
    I don't think you have understood. Can we drip something intentionally? Is it in our control to drip something?
     

    Florentia52

    Modwoman in the attic
    English - United States
    I think I may have cross-posted the last sentence of #4 with your reply, hectacon. Yes, it's perfectly possible to drip a substance intentionally.

    A recipe, for example, might call for you to drip cold water into the dough for pasta or biscuits. You can drip melted chocolate onto the top of a cake to decorate it.

    Here's the relevant definition from the WR dictionary:

    1. to let drops fall:[no object]This faucet drips.
    2. to (cause to) fall in drops; dribble
      [no object]The milk dripped out of the bottle and down her shirt.
    3. [~ + object]He dripped some water on her face.
     
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