Drop-needle mock

Little_LIS

Senior Member
Arabic,Egypt
Hi everybody,

I searched for the drop-needle mock in google images and I got it but, I want to understand themeaning of "drop-needle"

Thanks in advance :)
 
  • lablady

    Senior Member
    English - USA
    Hi Dr. Susy,

    It's a knitting technique. Here's an explanation:
    Drop-needle stitching is a commercial knitting technique which is used to create a specific look in a garment. A garment which features drop-needle stitching has a slightly ribbed effect, with thin parallel lines, dots, or other designs formed in a material at set intervals. ...Drop-needle stitching is used in garments to create openwork designs, areas in which the tight knit gives way to a lacy pattern, or to make a particular style of knitted ribbing.
    Source
     

    Little_LIS

    Senior Member
    Arabic,Egypt
    Thanks lablady :) I got it :)

    Cagey, it is an advertisement about a new drop-needle mock.

    ...With a hearty 10.3-oz. cotton knit and banded bottom.....
    oz. is ounce which is a measuring unit of mass, but I can't understand the underlined part!
     

    Franzi

    Senior Member
    (San Francisco) English
    Thanks lablady :) I got it :)

    Cagey, it is an advertisement about a new drop-needle mock.



    oz. is ounce which is a measuring unit of mass, but I can't understand the underlined part!
    I think it's a measurement of the weight (thickness/heaviness) of the yarn in this case.
     

    Franzi

    Senior Member
    (San Francisco) English
    I forgot a word :(

    "With a hearty 10.3-oz.100% cotton knit and banded bottom "

    Did it make any difference?
    No, it doesn't. The fabric is described three ways: it's a knit, it's heavy/thick/warm ("hearty 10.3 oz"), and it's made of cotton ("100% cotton"). Those are all descriptions of the fabric. The garment has a banded bottom.
     

    Cagey

    post mod (English Only / Latin)
    English - US
    I don't understand what a mock is. :( Could it be a smock?
    "Mock" is actually a shortened version of "mock turtleneck (collar)". A real turtleneck collar is double (or more) in width and you fold it down. A "mock [turtleneck]" is the correct width, but made to looked as though it were folded at the top edge.

    (I'm so glad you asked.)
     

    Franzi

    Senior Member
    (San Francisco) English
    "Mock" is actually a shortened version of "mock turtleneck (collar)". A real turtleneck collar is double (or more) in width and you fold it down. A "mock [turtleneck]" is the correct width, but made to looked as though it were folded at the top edge.

    (I'm so glad you asked.)
    Just for reference, it's not a word I'm familiar with either. I've always called those things "mock turtlenecks".
     

    Flaminius

    coclea mod
    日本語 / japāniski / יפנית
    "Mock" is actually a shortened version of "mock turtleneck (collar)". A real turtleneck collar is double (or more) in width and you fold it down. A "mock [turtleneck]" is the correct width, but made to looked as though it were folded at the top edge.

    (I'm so glad you asked.)
    I am so glad you answered. In fact I learnt another UK/US difference. :)
     

    Cagey

    post mod (English Only / Latin)
    English - US
    I am so glad you answered. In fact I learnt another UK/US difference. :)
    Hmm.

    Like Franzi, I wouldn't use mock by itself, either. I would say mock turtleneck. I was just translating, as it were, the usage in the thread. I don't know who uses mock by itself, or what distinguishes them from those who don't.

    (In my earlier thread. I should have made explicit what you probably already know anyway: the description of the collar is used to stand to for the whole garment: e.g., "Turtlenecks are on sale today!")
     
    Last edited:

    Flaminius

    coclea mod
    日本語 / japāniski / יפנית
    Oh, I should have put here a few words about the UK/US difference.

    It just happens that my primary source of information on English is two dictionaries from UK—not that I came across real usages in that country. I looked up turtleneck in them and found that both Cambridge and Oxford define;
    polo neck as a high round collar that folds over on itself and covers the neck (US equivalent being turtleneck); and
    turtleneck as a high round collar that does not fold over on itself, or a jumper with this type of collar (US equivalent being mock turtleneck).
     
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