Dropped off coffee mug as a gift

joh2001smile

Senior Member
Chinese
Hi,
What does it mean here?
In the company, salespersons are required to make a minimum of five calls a day.

One salesperson in this same company had entered in her call report, “Dropped off coffee mug as a gift.” Chalk up another “call”. Only for more to go and she could go home feeling good about how hard she worked. (Or could she?)
 
  • Thomas Tompion

    Senior Member
    English - England
    Hi,
    What does it mean here?
    In the company, salespersons are required to make a minimum of five calls a day.

    One salesperson in this same company had entered in her call report, “Dropped off coffee mug as a gift.” Chalk up another “call”. Only for more to go and she could go home feeling good about how hard she worked. (Or could she?)
    It must be 'Only four more to go', joh - she has to make five calls. 'Dropped off coffee mug as a gift' means that she called on someone and gave them a coffee mug as a gift (I imagine as a free sample) - to drop off means to deliver (in a different context it can also mean to go to sleep!). Delivering that coffee mug was her first visit, so she only had four more to go.
     

    joh2001smile

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    It must be 'Only four more to go', joh - she has to make five calls. 'Dropped off coffee mug as a gift' means that she called on someone and gave them a coffee mug as a gift (I imagine as a free sample) - to drop off means to deliver (in a different context it can also mean to go to sleep!). Delivering that coffee mug was her first visit, so she only had four more to go.
    Thomas,
    Thank you very much for rephrasing for me. I guess I am clear with the phrase. BTW, one of difficulities of the article is the understanding of the word "call" , which can either mean a visit or a telephone call. Could you tell me how to identify which meaning it is used? And, is a sales call a visit or a telephone call? (I did a google search, the results seemed to be telephone calls, but they seem to refer to a visit here in this paragragh)
     

    Trisia

    Senior Member
    Romanian
    From context.

    Instead of spending time convincing someone to buy their products, she only went there and left a complimentary coffee mug. It has to be a house call :D (click)
     

    Trisia

    Senior Member
    Romanian
    That's the idea.

    Only four more to go and she could go home feeling good about how hard she worked. (Or could she?)
    She avoided the tedious part of having to explain and persuade people, by simply offering a promotional mug. The bosses should decide if that is an authentic house call (after all, she did go there and promote the company, more or less) or just a delivery.

    P.S. It's a lot better if you use quotation marks or mark the text as a quote, when you have a larger portion of text. We can't know for sure which part is your question (in your own words) and which is a quotation from an article. Could you please try?
     

    joh2001smile

    Senior Member
    Chinese
    That's the idea.

    She avoided the tedious part of having to explain and persuade people, by simply offering a promotional mug. The bosses should decide if that is an authentic house call (after all, she did go there and promote the company, more or less) or just a delivery.

    P.S. It's a lot better if you use quotation marks or mark the text as a quote, when you have a larger portion of text. We can't know for sure which part is your question (in your own words) and which is a quotation from an article. Could you please try?
    Trisia, Thank you for your advice.
    what does "Dropped off coffee mug as a gift" mean here? In the company, salespersons are required to make a minimum of five calls a day. So far, Thomas has explained the phrase clearly for me. But as the word "call" can mean both telephone call or short visit, I wonder how to identify which meaning is used in different context.

    "One salesperson in this same company had entered in her call report, “Dropped off coffee mug as a gift.” Chalk up another “call”. Only four more to go and she could go home feeling good about how hard she worked. (Or could she?)"
     

    Trisia

    Senior Member
    Romanian
    Oh, I see. I'm sorry, I hadn't realised you were unclear about the meaning of the phrase itself (sorry :()

    To drop off something, in this context, means she brought it and left it there. (For example, you can use a lorry to transport merchandise and drop it off (unload it) at the destination)

    "Dropped off coffee mug as gift" = I went to one of the addresses I was supposed to visit and brought with me a coffee mug, that I offered as a free gift from our company.

    So, in a way, she did advertise for the company, but she didn't really stay to talk to the people there. She just went there, left the mug with those potential clients and then went on her way. This is why that question "Or, could she?" is there: it's asking whether this can be considered a house call or not.

    The context tells you what kind of call this is: It is a house call, because she couldn't send the mug by facsimile :D It says drop off (or unload), which implies her going there and leaving the mug.
     
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