drowsy bears

Cecilio

Senior Member
Spanish, Valencian/Catalan
Hello! Once I heard that there is a word in Russian to describe a bear that has woken up from lethargy too early, and wanders around the forest in a state of drowsiness. Apparently, there's even a Russian novel named after that word.
 
  • Aliocha_K

    Member
    Russia - Russian, French
    Hello Cecilio,

    I think that the word you're looking for is "косолапый", which litteraly means something like "with crooked paws".

    It's often used with the colloquial name of the bear, "мишка".

    "Мишка Косолапый
    По лесу идёт
    Шишки собирает
    Песенки поёт"


    A.K.
     

    Inara

    Senior Member
    Aliocha_K said:
    Hello Cecilio,

    I think that the word you're looking for is "косолапый", which litteraly means something like "with crooked paws".

    It's often used with the colloquial name of the bear, "мишка".

    "Мишка Косолапый
    По лесу идёт
    Шишки собирает
    Песенки поёт"

    A.K.
    I doubt Cecilio meant "косолапый". Because drowsy means "сонный", though that is not a word neigher. This kind of early woken bear is very dangerouse and indeed there is a name for it. Unfortunately I can't remember it now. Maybe someone else will help.
     

    Cecilio

    Senior Member
    Spanish, Valencian/Catalan
    Thanks for your help! The transliteration is "medved-shatun", am I right? I assume that the first part of the word ("Medved") means "bear" (Is it a symonym of "mishka"), and the second part refers to the verb. Is this a common word all over Russia? Is it possible to say just the second part of the compound, "shatun"?
     

    Inara

    Senior Member
    Cecilio said:
    Thanks for your help! The transliteration is "medved-shatun", am I right? I assume that the first part of the word ("Medved") means "bear" (Is it a symonym of "mishka"), and the second part refers to the verb. Is this a common word all over Russia? Is it possible to say just the second part of the compound, "shatun"?

    МЕДВЕДЬ (Medvedj) is bear, "mishka" is diminutive, like "teddy-bear".
    Usually you would use "medvedj-shatun", although it is easy to understand to what it refers if you just say "shatun". Depends on context.
    Is this a common word all over Russia? I don't know. People who live in the areas where this phenomenon is common may have some other words for it, but in the literature you will find "medvedj-shatun". Also refers to a person in a bad mood because they slept little. Hope it helps.

    P.S. "Shatatjsia", "ujti na shatal" = hacer campana :) saludo!
     
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