drug addict or drug addicted mothers

allthewayanime

Senior Member
Bilingual(Romanian-Italian)
I would like to know if both options are possible: She's a drug addict mother or She is a drug addicted mother.
 
  • allthewayanime

    Senior Member
    Bilingual(Romanian-Italian)
    I totally agree with you, but I've seen in an article that the author wrote 'drug addict' and that's why I wanted to know if it can be also used.
     

    Myridon

    Senior Member
    English - US
    "Drug addict mother" sounds more like the mother of a drug addict than a mother who is addicted to drugs. What is the source of the "article"?
     

    allthewayanime

    Senior Member
    Bilingual(Romanian-Italian)
    Movie : The Blind Side (wiki)
    'When Leigh Anne seeks to become Michael's legal guardian, she learns he was separated from his drug-addict mother when he was seven and that no one knows her whereabouts. She is also told that even though he scored low in almost every category in a career aptitude test, he is in the 98th percentile in "protective instincts".
     

    KHS

    Senior Member
    They hyphen and the complexity of the sentence help me find "drug-addict mother" quite acceptable, although like others, my reaction to the phrase out of context was that I probably wouldn't use it.

    Context is incredibly important!
     

    Egmont

    Senior Member
    English - U.S.
    Both are possible, and both are correct. It is partly a matter of style, but also depends on what you want to emphasize. "Drug-addict mother" focuses on her being a drug addict, then adding that she is Michael's mother. "Drug-addicted mother" focuses on her being a mother, but also describing her as addicted to drugs. A writer can choose one or the other.

    (I agree with cyberpedant about using hyphens in either.)
     

    lucas-sp

    Senior Member
    English - Californian
    In a sentence like that, you can use "drug-addict mother" in the same way as you can say, well, "astronaut aunt" or "championship karaoke singer father." Once you've got his or her or their, we accept a long chain of qualifications, since we know you're talking about one person.

    She struggles with the abuse she suffered at the hands of her young-adult novelist grandmother.
    He, ironically, finds love at the marriage of his Miami podiatrist-slash-Houdiniesque escape artist second cousin​.
     

    allthewayanime

    Senior Member
    Bilingual(Romanian-Italian)
    In other words 'drug-addict mother ' is a compound noun(drug-addict is a noun) and drug-addicted mother(in this case 'drug-addicted' is used as an adjective).

    Could someone confirm this statement?
     
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